Nursery and Reception

“Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible,

                                   and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” (St Francis of Assisi)

 

 

The EYFS Curriculum at St Peter At Gowts C of E Primary School

Vision Statement

Special, all of our children are special and unique and we want them to grow as individuals through the opportunities we give them, the experiences they have and opportunities to explore values through all their learning.

Play, play is a vital part of our children’s learning and we want them to have play-based experiences which allow them to develop confidence, resilience and enthusiasm for excellence in learning.

Always excited, engaged and enthusiastic- we will plan opportunities, experiences and resources to ensure our children love and are inspired in their learning.

Growing, we want our children to grow to celebrate differences and recognise the special qualities in others and in our community.

To make sure our children are happy in their play, happy in their learning and happy in their life.

Intent

At St Peter at Gowts, our EYFS curriculum is inspiring and creative unlocking potential in all. Our curriculum seeks to ensure that all pupils flourish through challenge, support and a broad and balanced curriculum rooted in shared values and consistently high expectations while striving for excellence. St Peter’s EYFS curriculum is fashioned through our golden threads of values, inspiration, excellence and community.

“Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” (St Francis of Assisi)

Our EYFS curriculum is designed to be exciting and engaging, focusing around purposeful play, open-ended resources and a rich learning environment with weekly awe and wonder experiences to inspire and enthuse our children. Our curriculum incorporates our vision, our ethos, our environment, our daily routines and timetables, our interactions and engagement with our children in addition to our written curriculum. It is designed to have a level of flexibility which responds to the needs of our children and enables children to help steer the curriculum to support their learning. Our long term curriculum is designed to be flexible and adaptable according to the needs and interests of our children. We have a focus on the development of communication, vocabulary and language, focusing on our children’s starting points. Our curriculum is carefully planned based on the needs of all of our children and their interests, thinking carefully about their background and experiences and is designed to give children, particularly the most disadvantaged, the knowledge, self-belief and cultural capital they need to succeed in life.

As a result of our rich and diverse community, we currently have 43% EAL in school and twenty different languages. Many of our children start with no English in Nursery and many of our parents only speak their home language to their child so our curriculum is designed to be rich in language and communication experiences. Our first hand experiences and activities using objects of reference, are a key strand throughout our curriculum to develop language. We use songs and books as a key focus of our curriculum to support language development.

We recognise and look to provide for the needs of our EAL learners through speaking in other languages (we have a TA who can speak other languages and use translation tools such as talking pens and Alexa to speak in other languages as well as staff learning simple words in different languages we have represented in our setting), visitors of different cultures, celebrating festivals from different cultures, singing and stories in other languages, representing pattern and print from other cultures, using dual language books and audio CDs in the setting and developing a cultural awareness in all.

In our school and local community, we have a wide range of cultures and we seek to broaden our children’s understanding of the world ‘on their doorstep’ and beyond through their experiences in the curriculum, for example experiencing food and festivals from the cultures in our setting, welcoming and working with members of our local community and working closely with our families through regular shared experiences. Our curriculum is planned to give many opportunities to experience life, celebrations and experiences from our cultures to promote harmony and understanding in our children as they grow and to prepare them for their role as a proactive citizen in our multicultural society.

Lincoln is in the top third of the most deprived districts nationally and there are significant levels of deprivation affecting skills and employment. Many of our children don’t experience the range of career opportunities they could have in the future so our curriculum is designed to give them experiences of the wider world of work through our visits and visitors and key themes. Through our curriculum we seek to ensure our children aspire to be the best they can be and we seek to be ‘unlocking potential in all’.

We recognise that many of our families do not have their own gardens and indeed outdoor space and through our curriculum and provision, we aim to support our children to learn outdoors and develop their physical skills, problem solving skills in the outdoor physical space and through our physical experiences in the curriculum. We recognise Lincolnshire’s priority health issues to increase the level of physical activity and resilience through this.

It is our intention that our children in EYFS develop their love and enthusiasm for learning through their play, based on what they already know and can do and they develop resilience, engagement, problem solving, collaboration and aspiration to support them in their future learning.  We link this to the most in-demand skills employers look for in order to start our children on their learning journey to future career opportunities (IT skills, adaptability, creativity, collaboration for example).

As a staff we considered the key outcomes for our children at the end of EYFS and have tailored our resources and planning to ensure we give children to opportunities to achieve in these areas. Our aims and aspirations are based on our children’s cultural capital. They are:

Nature– recognising creatures and not being afraid, caring for creatures, observant, looking after plants and developing skills to grow plants and use and eat their produce.

Why?-Many of our children do not have any experience of pets or animals and live in environments which do not give them the opportunity to grow plants and experience nature.

Understanding of eachother– their place in the world, tolerance and acceptance of others conflict resolution, enjoying a range of celebrations.

Why? We live in a multi-cultural community where racial conflict has been known to arise and our children need to be able to understand others and the world around them to become a responsible citizen in our community.

Physical skills– co-ordination skills in order to be able to ride a bike, climb trees, balance, jump and explore their space and to be able to use real tools to design and build their own creations.

Why? Our children often start Nursery below where we would expect them to be with their physical skills and this is partly due to their environment- many of our children do not have gardens or outside spaces and don’t have access to many opportunities to develop key physical skills both gross and fine motor.

Risk Taking– to be confident in taking risks.

Why? We are aspiring to support our children to become confident in identifying risks and taking appropriate risks to learn to deal with risk as they grow. We feel this is something that our children need to become confident learners as through taking risks they learn to grow.

Language– to be able to speak in a full sentence, making up their own stories and using language to make their wants and needs known to others.

Why? To support our children in their development of language- many of our children start in Nursery with no English (coming from a different cultural background) or have poor language and communication skills when starting. Language and communication is fundamental for our children to develop all of their other skills and we prioritise these skills in all our time with our children.

 

Our curriculum is based on the 7 statements written in the EYFS Statutory Framework 2021

Communication and Language

The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development. Children’s back-and-forth interactions from an early age form the foundations for language and cognitive development. The number and quality of the conversations they have with adults and peers throughout the day in a language-rich environment is crucial. By commenting on what children are interested in or doing, and echoing back what they say with new vocabulary added, practitioners will build children’s language effectively. Reading frequently to children, and engaging them actively in stories, non-fiction, rhymes and poems, and then providing them with extensive opportunities to use and embed new words in a range of contexts, will give children the opportunity to thrive. Through conversation, story-telling and role play, where children share their ideas with support and modelling from their teacher, and sensitive questioning that invites them to elaborate, children become comfortable using a rich range of vocabulary and language structures.

Personal, Social and Emotional Development

Children’s personal, social and emotional development (PSED) is crucial for children to lead healthy and happy lives, and is fundamental to their cognitive development. Underpinning their personal development are the important attachments that shape their social world. Strong, warm and supportive 9 relationships with adults enable children to learn how to understand their own feelings and those of others. Children should be supported to manage emotions, develop a positive sense of self, set themselves simple goals, have confidence in their own abilities, to persist and wait for what they want and direct attention as necessary. Through adult modelling and guidance, they will learn how to look after their bodies, including healthy eating, and manage personal needs independently. Through supported interaction with other children, they learn how to make good friendships, co-operate and resolve conflicts peaceably. These attributes will provide a secure platform from which children can achieve at school and in later life.

Physical Development

Physical activity is vital in children’s all-round development, enabling them to pursue happy, healthy and active lives7. Gross and fine motor experiences develop incrementally throughout early childhood, starting with sensory explorations and the development of a child’s strength, co-ordination and positional awareness through tummy time, crawling and play movement with both objects and adults. By creating games and providing opportunities for play both indoors and outdoors, adults can support children to develop their core strength, stability, balance, spatial awareness, co-ordination and agility. Gross motor skills provide the foundation for developing healthy bodies and social and emotional well-being. Fine motor control and precision helps with hand-eye co-ordination, which is later linked to early literacy. Repeated and varied opportunities to explore and play with small world activities, puzzles, arts and crafts and the practice of using small tools, with feedback and support from adults, allow children to develop proficiency, control and confidence.

Literacy

It is crucial for children to develop a life-long love of reading. Reading consists of two dimensions: language comprehension and word reading. Language comprehension (necessary for both reading and writing) starts from birth. It only develops when adults talk with children about the world around them and the books (stories and non-fiction) they read with them, and enjoy rhymes, poems and songs together. Skilled word reading, taught later, involves both the speedy working out of the pronunciation of unfamiliar printed words (decoding) and the speedy recognition of familiar printed words. Writing involves transcription (spelling and handwriting) and composition (articulating ideas and structuring them in speech, before writing).

Mathematics

Developing a strong grounding in number is essential so that all children develop the necessary building blocks to excel mathematically. Children should be able to count confidently, develop a deep understanding of the numbers to 10, the relationships between them and the patterns within those numbers. By providing frequent and varied opportunities to build and apply this understanding – such as using manipulatives, including small pebbles and tens frames for organising counting – children will develop a secure base of knowledge and vocabulary from which mastery of mathematics is built. In addition, it is important that the curriculum includes rich opportunities for children to develop their spatial reasoning skills across all areas of mathematics including shape, space and measures. It is important that children develop positive attitudes and interests in mathematics, look for patterns and relationships, spot connections, ‘have a go’, talk to adults and peers about what they notice and not be afraid to make mistakes.

Understanding the World

Understanding the world involves guiding children to make sense of their physical world and their community. The frequency and range of children’s personal experiences increases their knowledge and sense of the world around them – from visiting parks, libraries and museums to meeting important members of society such as police officers, nurses and firefighters. In addition, listening to a broad selection of stories, non-fiction, rhymes and poems will foster their understanding of our culturally, socially, technologically and ecologically diverse world. As well as building important knowledge, this extends their familiarity with words that support understanding across domains. Enriching and widening children’s vocabulary will support later reading comprehension.

Expressive Arts and Design

The development of children’s artistic and cultural awareness supports their imagination and creativity. It is important that children have regular opportunities to engage with the arts, enabling them to explore and play with a wide range of media and materials. The quality and variety of what children see, hear and participate in is crucial for developing their understanding, self-expression, vocabulary and ability to communicate through the arts. The frequency, repetition and depth of their experiences are fundamental to their progress in interpreting and appreciating what they hear, respond to and observe.

We aim for all of our children, no matter what their background, needs or challenges, to develop, aspire and deepen their knowledge in all 7 areas of the EYFS curriculum and are ambitious for all of our learners.

 

 

Implementation

Our curriculum is designed to use different approaches to support our children’s learning with a key strand being the opportunity for children to learn through their play and to experience learning in a hands on, practical way. We ensure the environment and provision is inspiring, interactive and engaging for our learners.

Child Initiated play (Learning through Play) is high priority on our timetables and fundamental in our approach to learning. We dedicate extended time for children to be able to have opportunities for sustained learning in their play in order that they reach a deeper level of engagement. Within our provision we provide a range of open ended resources (loose parts play) in order to develop children’s creativity, symbolic play and creativity. We use many ‘real resources’ to aid children in applying skills to their lives and experiences.

We ensure a level of challenge for all learners through our levelled common play behaviours and resources aligned with these, which are focused on the key skills to develop in each area, appropriate to the children’s identified needs, and through our interactions and engagements. We give children resources and opportunities through their play to challenge themselves and often add in a specific challenge using our ‘sound buttons’ and also use Rainbow challenges with our children.

We utilise the skills of our team to ‘go to’ the children in their child initiated time to develop and support their learning and key skills as opposed to ‘adult guided’ activities. Children’s skills can be developed through their own choice of learning, for example mark making in the sand pit or understanding of capacity in the water tray. We support our children’s progression in key skills through our progression grids which we refer to.

We use group shared sessions and key person time to give our children opportunities to experience wow moments, shared learning experiences using first hand experiences and objects of reference. We ensure there are a range of trips and visitors to bring the curriculum alive for our children and give them experiences they might not otherwise have (linked to cultural capital).

We recognise that books have a high impact on our children’s learning experiences and as such our curriculum is designed so that a book is the lead for each of our two week blocks. We choose books which are from Pie Corbett’s Reading Spine and the Book Trust’s best reads as well as books which represent other cultures and address stereotypes and stigmas. We also use books which our children have shown an interest in or that we recognise as teachers and TAs, are engaging and exciting books and we link these experiences to Talk4Write.

We utilise the Read, Write, Inc approach to teaching our children phonics which begins, when children are ready, in Nursery. Pre-phonics activities are designed to cater to pre-phonics skills such as symbolism, physical development which supports the ability to sit still and listen, listening and attention skills, spoken language, meta-linguistic awareness and phonological awareness.

We have carefully considered our Maths curriculum and utilise White Rose Maths for Reception, using some of the models and images with Nursery. We also use Little Big Maths across EYFS to develop key maths skills on a daily basis as well as building in mathematical opportunities and models and images in provision and use a planned maths overview for Nursery.

Impact

We assess regularly and identify what we know the child has learned through our focus weeks, wow moments and staff knowledge of our children. We use a tracking system looking at those children who are working at the expected level (no concerns) those who we have moderate concerns about and those we have significant concerns about.  We review any barriers to learning and talk as a team about how to address these, using additional resources as appropriate such as the Early Support Developmental Journal, to pinpoint significant needs.

As a team we have regular meetings to discuss children and their outcomes and review the support and needs of any children we have identified as having concerns about and review on our tracker every half term. This feeds into our planning and next steps.

Our understanding of our children’s learning and progress drives our planning and provision and areas which are seen to be an area which the vast majority of the cohort are working at a lower level in, becomes a focus for enhancing our provision, practice and planned activities.

Engagement

Leuven scales used in both settings demonstrate a high level of engagement and children are able to talk about their learning, particularly books they are using as focus and first hand/ awe and wonder experiences.

 

Overarching Themes

 Autumn TermSpring TermSummer Term
Overarching ThemeAutumn

 

Winter and SpringSummer
CelebrationsBonfire Night (art resources to create)

Diwali (colour exploration)

Advent and Christmas

Remembrance Sunday

Easter/ Lent/ Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday

Holi

Chinese New Year

Eid-ul-fitr/ Ramadan

Orthodox Christmas

Buddhist New Year

St Valentines Day

Mothers’ Day/ Fathers’ Day

 

Celebrations- weddings/ christenings

Platinum Jubilee

Raksha Bandhan

 

Possible Ideas / lines of enquiry These mini ideas within the themes may change or be replaced depending on child interest or fascination.Autumn (see Hygge)

All about me, my family, houses and homes, my heroes/superheroes

My favourite things/ toys from the past

Christmas around the world

Dinosaurs/ Bears

Robots/ Inventions/ Experiments

Owls and other nocturnal animals

 

Winter(see Hygge)

Comparing weather in other countries

Growing

Spring(see Hygge)

Minibeasts

Space

Colours

 

Summer (see Hygge)

Over the clouds- aeroplanes/holidays

Jubilee- tea parties and celebrations

Fairy tales, Nursery rhymes and traditional tales

The Seaside

Life skillsCooking and baking

Visiting the shops to buy ingredients

Teeth brushing skills

Fire pit cooking

Our own allotment/ gardening and eating produce.

Riding a Bike

Using tools

Possible Key ExperiencesPhotos of families

Visits from babies/ older relatives

Play Avenue visit- Role Play

Diwali visits- Sunita

Forest School experiences

Multi-cultural cooking

Sports visits/ lead experiences

Library visit

Community visits- Care homes and religious buildings/ fire station/ train station/ garage

The Collection

Pets at Home

Local walks- post a letter/Lincoln City

World Hello Day

Visiting artists

Harvest Festival

Christmas visit- Rand/ Sundown

Going to choose a Christmas tree

 

Rhubarb Theatre

Visiting storytellers

Zoo lab

Play park visits

Forest School experiences

Rape seed cooking

Community visits- Care homes and religious buildings/ fire station/ train station

Museum of Lincolnshire Life

Lincoln Castle

Language Weeks

Pairing of schools- video calls

Visiting artists

Sunflower competition

Planetarium

Planting and growing

Visiting animals

 

Woodside Wildlife Park

Sundown Adventure

Beach and aquarium

Circus skills

Butterflies and Frogs growing or chicks

Forest School experiences

Allotment visit/ Uncle Henrys

Community visits- Care homes and religious buildings/ fire station/ train station

The Drill Hall/ LPAC

Visiting artists

Belton House adventure playground

 

Key Texts

T4W

T4W N– Mr Wiggle and Mr Waggle

Where’s Spot

 

T4W R– Gingerbread Man

Take a Walk Little Bear

 

T4W N -Little Red Hen

Squeaky Story

 

T4W R-Sleepy Bumble Bee

Jack and the Beanstalk

 

 

T4W N-Three Billy Goats’ Gruff

Stuck in the Mud

 

T4W R- Farmer Duck

The Kiss that Missed

 

Key Texts

Pie Corbett

Pie Corbett Reading Spine

Nursery

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt

Hairy McLary from Donaldson’s Dairy

Hug

 

Reception

Owl Babies

The Gruffalo

Rosie’s Walk

Six Dinner Sid

On the Way Home

Shhh!

 

 

Pie Corbett Reading Spine

Nursery

Jaspers’ Beanstalk

The Very Hungry Caterpillar

Each Peach Pear Plum

Come on Daisy

Jack in the Beanstalk

 

Reception

Goodnight Moon

Whatever Next

 

 

 

 

Pie Corbett Reading Spine

Nursery

Dear Zoo

You Choose

The Train Ride

 

 

Reception

Handa’s Surprise

Mr Gumpy’s Outing

Mrs Armitage

 

 

 

Other Key Possible TextsNursery

This bear, that bear

Dinosaur Roar!

Fox’s Socks

Pete the Cat

Wow said the owl!

My Hair!

I can do it too

Dinosaur Dig!

That’s not my stick

Lola at the Library

Hug?

Leo gets a checkup

Time for Kenny

I can do it too

You are a beautiful beginning

Love Monster

Hello World, How do Apples Grow?

Not a Stick

The Very Busy Spider

The Little Mouse, The Red Ripe Strawberry and The Big Hungry Bear

Pick a Pine Tree

 

Reception

How to be a lion

Supertato

Dinosaur Dig!

The bear and the piano

The mega magic hair swap

The day you begin

When you are brave

The proudest blue

Stickman

Apples, apples everywhere

Stanley’s Stick

Spinderella

One Snowy Night

 

Nursery

Beautiful oops

Teatime around the world

My 1st Ramadan

A House for Every Bird

A Big Mooncake for Little Star

Small World

The Big Carrot

Over and under the snow

Tree- Seasons come, seasons go

Tiny perfect things

 

 

Reception

What the Ladybird Heard

Oi Frog

Aliens love Underpants

Dinosaur Rocket!

Look up!

Rashad’s Ramadan and Eid-al-Fitr

Lailah’s Lunchbox

Lima’s Red Hot Chilli

Here We Are

How to Catch a Star

Oliver’s Vegetables

I can only draw worms

Superworm

The Tiny Seed

The Bad Tempered Ladybird

Once upon a raindrop

A River

A Nest is noisy

 

 

Nursery

Lost and Found

My Mama is a Mechanic

I know numbers!

Boxitects

The Blue Balloon

Walking through the Jungle

Hooray for Fish

10 dots

 

Reception

Tiddler

The Princess and the Pea

Malala’s Magic Pencil

Billy’s Bucket

Rosie Revere, Engineer

Ada Twist Scientist

Paperbag Princess

Sharing a Shell

Snail and the Whale

Rumble in the Jungle

Commotion in the Ocean

 

Experiences linked to aspirations and aims

 

Learn songs and stories from different cultures

Visitors from our local community

Fish in Nursery and Giant Land Snails in Reception, Wormery and Container pools- visits from other animals ie Zoo lab

Allotments- growing our own food.

Forest Schools

Celebrations and festivals/ visits to our community and from our community/ mindfulness and conflict resolution teaching

Bike riding and climbing activities

Real Tools experiences throughout- specific work bench areas.

Story telling experiences, books, theatre visits, performances, language in provision, language rich environment.

RE and ValuesNursery

LAS Unit-Myself

LAS Unit- My Senses

 

 

Reception

LAS Unit- Myself

LAS Unit- Special People to Me

 

 

 

Values

Autumn A

Peace, Hope and Trust

 

Autumn B

Honesty

Love

 

 

Nursery

LAS Unit– My friends

LAS Unit– Special Things

 

 

Reception

LAS Unit- Our Special Books

Salvation UC F3 (core) Why do Christians put a cross in an Easter garden?

 

Values

Spring A

Friendship and Forgiveness

Justice

 

Spring B

Self Belief

Happiness

 

Nursery

LAS Unit– Our Special Places

LAS Unit  Special Times

 

 

Reception

LAS Unit- Our Beautiful World

Creation UC F1 (core)Why is the word ‘God’ so important to Christians?

 

 

Values

Summer A

Wisdom

Creation

 

Summer B

Responsibility

Respect

 

 

 

EYFS Curriculum 2021

Communication and Language
The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development. Children’s back-and-forth interactions from an early age form the foundations for language and cognitive development. The number and quality of the conversations they have with adults and peers throughout the day in a language-rich environment is crucial. By commenting on what children are interested in or doing, and echoing back what they say with new vocabulary added, practitioners will build children’s language effectively. Reading frequently to children, and engaging them actively in stories, non-fiction, rhymes and poems, and then providing them with extensive opportunities to use and embed new words in a range of contexts, will give children the opportunity to thrive. Through conversation, story-telling and role play, where children share their ideas with support and modelling from their teacher, and sensitive questioning that invites them to elaborate, children become comfortable using a rich range of vocabulary and language structures.
Characteristics of Effective Learning
Children will be engaged in: playing and exploring (children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’; active learning (children will concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter any difficulties, and enjoy achievements); creating and thinking critically (children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things)
Setting Specific Goal
To be able to speak in a full sentence, making up their own stories and using language to make their wants and needs known to others.

 

2-3 Year Olds
Baseline

·        By around 2 years old, am I showing an interest in what other children are playing and sometimes joining in?

·        Am I using up to 50 words and can put 2-3 words together?

·        Do I often ask questions?

·        Can I understand many more words than I can say and understand simple questions and instructions ie what’s the boy doing?

·        Can I stop when I hear familiar songs/ rhymes?

 

Skills and Knowledge

·        Responds to familiar songs and rhymes through moving to the music or joining in with some actions.

·        Enjoys singing music and toys that make sounds.

·        Responds to direct instruction with Makaton symbols or picture cues to support.

·        Recognise and point to objects if asked about them.

·        Responds to routine instructions ie get coat.

·        Gives eye contact to adults talking to them.

·        Sits on the carpet when called- carpet sitting skills

·        Copies gestures and words- mirroring vocabulary

·        Listening skills- respond to adults appropriately.

·        Responds to simple instructions in their home language, where appropriate.

·        Uses single words during play.

·        Begin to talk about people and things that are not present.

·        Beginning to put 2-3 words together to develop onto 3-4 words.

·        Start to say how they feeling.

·       Enjoy laughing with others.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Refer to Elklan  Tier 2 Level 1 describing words checklist (see MTP for weekly specific word focus)

·        Specific theme focused words- see other areas.

 

Enabling Environments

·       See common play behaviour documents

·        Reading frequently to children providing them with a range of high quality texts focusing on simple texts such as ‘that’s not my…’ stories- daily story time.

·        Range of simple books in baskets in provision to enable using books in play- include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·        Providing the children with a range of opportunities to use and embed new words ie sensory bin explorations, active songs, games- simple 1 word descriptions.

·        Specific teaching of key vocabulary, adults modelling and narrating play.

·        Language rich environment with staff engaging in narrating play and simple recasting.

·        Differentiated visual symbols for representation – Makaton symbols.

·        Weekly ‘Let’s Explore’ time looking at physical objects to explore single word language.

·        Use of differentiated objects of reference- more complex as children’s skills progress.

·        Daily singing including the use of Nursery Rhyme Progression -Humpty Dumpty, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Row, Row, Twinkle Twinkle, Dingle Dangle Scarecrow, Incy wincy, Old McDonald, Hickory Dickory Dock, The grand old duke of York, Clap your hands- to listen to rhymes.

·        Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

·        Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

·        Range of differentiated musical instruments and toys that make music/ noises in provision.

·        Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Set up differentiated shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking.

·        Provide practical experiences that encourage children to talk to each other, ask and respond to questions.

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I begin to follow instructions with 1-2 keywords sometimes needing physical cues? ( Can I repeat words and find objects when asked ie shoes)

·        Can I use between 100-200 words?

·        Am I linking between 3-4 words together?

·        Can I listen to familiar songs/rhymes?

Skills and Knowledge  

·        Responds to familiar songs and rhymes by starting to join in- shows that they know many rhymes.

·        Responds to simple instructions without cues including routines.

·        Can recognise and name key objects and use some words for actions- learning new words rapidly.

·        Show listening skills by responding appropriately ie giving an appropriate verbal response.

·        Uses word strings during play.

·        Beginning to put more words together and use this to develop conversation.

·        Begins to ask a simple question.

·        Begin to use I and me when speaking.

·        Begins to show interest in stories and the noises adults make when reading stories and can sometimes offer a comment about a story.

·        Attention focused on  own tasks but can shift if attention fully obtained.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Refer to Elklan  Tier 2 Level 1 describing words checklist (see MTP for weekly specific word focus)

·        Specific theme focused words- see other areas.

 

Enabling Environments

·        See common play behaviour documents

·        Reading frequently to children providing them with a range of high quality texts focusing on simple texts with predictable text- daily story time – include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·        Providing the children with a range of opportunities to use and embed new words ie sensory exploration, active songs, games- two word descriptions and wider range of verbs.

·        Weekly ‘Let’s Explore’ time looking at physical objects to explore 2-3 word descriptions.

·        Specific teaching of key vocabulary, adults modelling and narrating play.

·        Differentiated visual symbols for representation – Makaton symbols.

·        Use of differentiated objects of reference- more complex as children’s skills progress.

·        Daily singing including the use of Nursery Rhyme Progression – Wind the bobbin up, It’s raining, it’s pouring, Pat-a-cake, Teddy bear, teddy bear, If you’re happy and you know it…, Polly put the kettle on, Hey Diddle Diddle, Jack and Jill, The wheels on the bus, Sleeping bunnies  – to listen to rhymes.

·        Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

·        Range of books in baskets in provision to enable using books in play.

·        Language rich environment with staff engaging in narrating more complex play and recasting.

·        Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

·        Range of differentiated musical instruments

·        Set up differentiated shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking.

·        Provide practical experiences that encourage children to talk to each other, ask and respond to questions.

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Can I use around 300 words including descriptive language and words for time, space and function?

·        Can I follow instructions with 3 key words?

·        Am I linking up to 5 words together?

·        Am I starting to use pronouns, plurals and prepositions (not always correctly)?

·        Can I start to join in with a rhyme (perhaps by using the actions or a word)

·        Am I interested in books and stories?

·        Can I stop what I am doing and listen to an adult?

Skills and Knowledge 

·        Confidently sings a range of known rhymes.

·        Follows more complex instructions.

·        Uses a wider range of vocabulary based on their own experience and focus words.

·        Shows good listening skills- be able to listen with increasing retention and recall.

·        Uses sentences in play including more questions using who what and where.

·        Use I and me confidently when speaking and begin to use he, she, they.

·        Talks about familiar stories and can usually understand what is happening with the use of the pictures.

·        Able to give appropriate attention to engaging activities and known routines (ie Hello Song).

Key Vocabulary

The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

Refer to Elklan  Tier 2 Level 1 describing words checklist (see MTP for weekly specific word focus)

Specific theme focused words- see other areas.

 

Enabling Environments

·       See common play behaviour documents

·        Reading frequently to children providing them with a range of high quality texts focusing on more complex texts such as those on the reading spine (see overview)- daily story time – include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·        Weekly ‘Let’s Explore’ time looking at physical objects to explore longer word descriptions.

·        Language rich environment with staff engaging in simple back and forth interactions, modelling and recasting language.

·        Range of more complex books in baskets in provision to enable using books in play.

·        Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Providing the children with a range of opportunities to use and embed new words ie sensory bin explorations, active songs, games- simple word strings.

·        Specific teaching of key vocabulary, adults modelling and narrating play.

·        Differentiated visual symbols for representation – Makaton symbols.

·        Use of differentiated objects of reference- more complex as children’s skills progress.

·        Daily singing including the use of Nursery Rhyme Progression –5 little speckled frogs, Little Bo Peep (first verse), Miss Polly had a Dolly, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Once I Caught a Fish Alive, 5 little ducks, See Saw, Open shut them Here we go round the mulberry bush- listening to rhymes.

·         Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

·        Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

·        Range of differentiated musical instruments and toys that make music/ noises in provision.

·        Set up differentiated shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking.

·        Provide practical experiences that encourage children to talk to each other, ask and respond to questions.

End of Year

·        By around 3 years old, can I shift from one task to another if someone gets my attention. Using my name can help: “Jason, please can you stop now? We’re tidying up”.

·        Around the age of 3, can I show that I understand action words by pointing to the right picture in a book. For example: “Who’s jumping?”

·        Can I ask for help if I need it?

·        Can I speak in simple sentences?

3-4 Year Olds
Baseline

·        By around 3 years old, can I shift from one task to another if someone gets my attention. Using my name can help: “Jason, please can you stop now? We’re tidying up”.

·        Around the age of 3, can I show that I understand action words by pointing to the right picture in a book. For example: “Who’s jumping?”

·        Can I ask for help if I need it?

·        Can I speak in simple sentences?

 

Skills and Knowledge

Listening and Attention

(Aut 1)

·     Listen to other people’s talk with interest, but can easily be distracted by other things.

·     Watch someone’s face as they talk.

·     Listen to simple stories with the help of picture clues.

·     Generally focus on an activity of their own choice and find it difficult to be directed by an adult.

·     Understand simple questions with 1 or 2 information carrying words, e.g., ‘Where is teddy?’

·     Respond to very simple requests especially when shown first by an adult.

·     Match objects to names and will bring a favourite toy when asked.

(Aut 2)

·    Concentrates for a longer period of time, e.g., 3 minutes.

·        Listen to simple stories and understand what is happening, with the help of the pictures.

·        Listens to a range of stories- able to answer a simple question..

·        Join in with rhymes and songs by making sounds and by moving body.

·     Listen and respond to a simple instruction.

·     Responds to adults making sounds or moving their bodies, e.g., clapping to stop activities.

·     Understand and act on longer sentences like ‘make teddy jump’ or ‘find your coat’.

Semantics

·        Comprehends approximately 900 words and has 500 intelligible words

·        Points to pictures of 10 objects described by their use

·        Listens to a story

·        Knows own sex and difference

·        Knows in/on/under/ big/little

·        Matches colours

·        Has complicated, sequenced routines for daily activities (bedtime, meals); objects to change (beginning of time/sequence awareness)

·        Answers six to seven agent/action questions (what runs?)

·        Answers simple “who, why, where, how many “ questions (3 years)

·        Answers one of three questions (what do you do when you’re hungry, sleepy or cold?)

·        Can ask simple questions (what’s that?)

·        Yes/No questions emerging (is he sleeping?)

·        Repeats sentence of six to seven syllables accurately.

 

Syntax- Morphology (grammatical markers)

·     Auxiliary “is/am + ing” (girl is running)

·     Regular past tense verbs appear (walk/walked) Uses “s” for possession (Daddy’s car)  Uses pronouns – I, me, you, mine (he, she, and it emerging)  Negative “not emerging

·     Uses contracted form of “is” (he’s running)

·     Adverbs of location emerging (here, there)

·     Begins to use do, can and will (emerging future tense)

·     Uses imperatives (commands: go get it, don’t)

·     Understands “est” adjective marker (biggest)

·     Comprehends third person pronouns (he, she) 20% nouns, 25% verbs

·     Mean length of response is 3.4 words

·     Infinitive complement (I want to play) emerging

Phonology (structure and sequence of speech sounds)

·        Still some substitutions and distortion of consonants.

·        Improving intelligibility to approx. 80%

·        Consonants mastered p,m,n,w,h

Pragmatics (appropriate communication)

·        Engages in dialogue

·        Begins to assume the role of another person in play

·        Requests permission.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Refer to Elklan  Tier 2 Level 2 vocabulary list (see MTP) (Teach level 1 to specific children as needed)

·        Well Comm key vocab through assessments.

·        Talk 4 Writing key vocabulary link

·        Specific theme focused words- see other areas.

 

 

Enabling Environments

·       See Common Play Behaviours

·        Language rich environment with staff engaging in interactions with children, modelling and supporting through recasting and questioning.

·        Range of simple books including non-fiction and fiction in baskets in provision to enable using books in play – include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·        Weekly ‘Let’s Talk’ time looking at physical objects and pictures to explore developing language and application of language.

·        Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Reading frequently to children providing them with a range of high quality texts focusing key texts linked to reading spine and T4W (see overview)- daily story time. include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·        Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Providing the children with a range of opportunities to use and embed new words ie talking times, awe and wonder sessions, let’s celebrate

·        Specific teaching of key vocabulary, adults modelling and narrating play.

·        Differentiated visual symbols for representation – Makaton symbols.

·        Daily singing including the use of Nursery Rhyme Progression – Humpty Dumpty, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Row, Row, Twinkle Twinkle, Dingle Dangle Scarecrow, Incy wincy, Old McDonald, Hickory Dickory Dock, The grand old duke of York, Clap your hands

·        Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

·        Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

·        Range of differentiated musical instruments.

·         Set up shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking, or stories that can be re-enacted (T4W)

·        Provide practical experiences that encourage children to talk to each other, ask and respond to questions.

·        Provide story maps (T4W) for children to retell familiar stories.

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Do I enjoy listening to longer stories and can remember much of what happens.

·        Do I pay attention to more than one thing at a time, which can be difficult.

·        Can I use a wider range of vocabulary and understand a question or instruction that has two parts, such as: “Get your coat and wait at the door”.

 

Skills and Knowledge

Listening and Attention

(Spring1)

·    Focus on the person who is talking in a calm environment, e.g., small group activity.

·    Switch attention when given a clear prompt, e.g. stop and listen.

·    Concentrates for a longer period of time, e.g., 6 minutes.

(Spring 2)

·    Focus on adults as they read or sing, responding with sounds and movements.

·    In simple terms, is beginning to use characters and actions from stories and rhymes in their play, e.g., ‘pig’ for the 3 little pigs

·    Understand questions that maybe more abstract. E.g.’ ‘Where is the bear going?’

·    Respond to two requests with space in between them.

Semantics

·        Comprehends 1,500 – 2,000 words

·        Knows front and back of clothes

·        Responds to commands involving three actions

·        Recognizes one colour

 

Phonology (structure and sequence of speech sounds)

·        Uses final consonants most of the time.

·        Phonological processes disappearing.

o   Consonant assimilation swapping similar sounds

o   Diminutization adding i to the end of nouns doggy

o   Prevocalic voicing voiceless consonant in the beginning of a word like k or f is substituted with a voiced consonant like g or v

o   Reduplication when a complete or incomplete syllable is repeated “baba” for “bottle”

o   Unstressed syllable deletion unstressed or week syllables omitted “nana” for banana “ocpus “ for octopus

o   Fronting Velar or palatal sounds like k, g and sh are substituted with alveolar sounds like t, and s“tootie” for cookie

Pragmatics (appropriate communication)

·        Uses more fillers to acknowledge partner’s message (uh-huh, ok)

·        Engages in longer dialogue

·        Corrects Others

·        Primitive Narratives- event follows from simple core.

 

Syntax- Morphology (grammatical markers)

·        Beginning to use “is” at beginning of question

·        Third person singular present tense(s) emerging (he runs)  Contracted forms of modals (won’t, can’t)

·        Irregular plural forms emerging (child/children)

·        Uses “are” with plural nouns (boys are running)

·        Uses “and” as conjunction

·        Regular plural forms are consistent Uses is, are, am in a sentence

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Refer to Elklan  Tier 2 Level 3 vocabulary list (see MTP) (Teach level 1 to specific children as needed)

·        Well Comm key vocab through assessments.

·        Talk 4 Writing key vocabulary link

·        Specific theme focused words- see other areas.

 

Enabling Environments

·       See Common Play Behaviours

·       Language rich environment with staff engaging in interactions with children, modelling and supporting through more complex questioning and challenge.

·       Range of more interest focused books in baskets in provision to enable using books in play – include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·       Weekly ‘Let’s Talk’ time looking at physical objects and pictures to explore developing language and application of language- more complex descriptive language.

·       Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Reading frequently to children providing them with a range of high quality texts focusing key texts linked to reading spine and T4W (see overview)- daily story time. include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·        Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Providing the children with a range of opportunities to use and embed new words ie talking times, awe and wonder sessions, let’s celebrate

·        Specific teaching of key vocabulary, adults modelling and narrating play.

·        Differentiated visual symbols for representation – Makaton symbols.

·        Daily singing including the use of Nursery Rhyme Progression – Wind the bobbin up, It’s raining, it’s pouring, Pat-a-cake, Teddy bear, teddy bear, If you’re happy and you know it…, Polly put the kettle on, Hey Diddle Diddle, Jack and Jill, The wheels on the bus, Sleeping bunnies

·        Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

·        Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

·        Range of differentiated musical instruments.

·         Set up shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking, or stories that can be re-enacted (T4W)

·        Provide practical experiences that encourage children to talk to each other, ask and respond to questions.

·        Provide story maps (T4W) for children to retell familiar stories.

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Am I able to express a point of view and to debate when I disagree with an adult or a friend, using words as well as actions?

·        Can I start a conversation with an adult or a friend and continue it for many turns? Can I use talk to organise myself and my play: “Let’s go on a bus… you sit there… I’ll be the driver.”

·        Do I know many rhymes, am able to talk about familiar books, and am able to tell a long story.

·        I can follow an instruction with 2 parts.

 

Skills and Knowledge

Listening and Attention

(Su 1)

·        Can join in with familiar rhymes and stories.

·        Can follow a story with props and pictures.

·        Has increased vocabulary to match their language rich environment.

·        Listen to and follow simple directions.

(Su 2)

·        Is able to turn their head and focus on adults and friends as they speak and play, responding to comments.

·        Shows an interest in others and events.

·        Enjoy listening to longer stories and can remember much of what happens.

·        Understand ‘why’ questions, like: “Why do you think the caterpillar got so big?”

·        Understand a question or instruction that has two parts, such as: “Get your coat and wait at the door” but may need help carrying out the instruction.

 

Phonology (structure and sequence of speech sounds)

·        Becoming very intelligible in connected speech

·        Continued refinement of articulatory skills taking place

·        Consonants mastered: b, d, k, g, f, y

·        Phonological processes continuing after age 3:

Cluster reduction-Consonant cluster is reduced to a single  “pane” for plane

Deplatalization,-A palatal sound is substituted with a nonpalatal sound “fit” for fish

Final devoicing –A voiced consonant at the end of a word like b or d is substituted with a voiced consonant like g or v “pick” for pig

Gliding- r becomes a w and l becomes a w or y sound “wabbit” for rabbit or “yeyo” for yellow

Stopping- A fricative like f or s or affricate ch, j is substituted with a stop constant like p or d

 

Pragmatics (appropriate communication)

·        Engages in more complex dialogues

·        Begins using language for fantasies, jokes, teasing

·        Makes conversational repairs when listener has not understood

·        Begins code switching (using simpler language) when talking to very young children

·        Uses more elliptical responses ( omission of words from a sentence “ I played in the sand , and Ben did too”).

Semantics

·        Understands concept of the number three (give me just three) Knows between, above, below, top, bottom

·        Names one colour (54 months) Can recognize two to three primary colours (54 months)

 

Syntax- Morphology (grammatical markers)

·        Possessive marker “s” consistent  Regular third person singular (-s) consistent

·        Simple past tense (t, d) consistent (walk/walked)

·        Present progressive “is + ing” consistent

·        Contractions used consistently Uses negative “not” consistently  Pronouns: he, she, I you, me, mine consistent

·        “Are, they, their” used inconsistently

·        Reflexive pronoun “myself” emerging

·        More adverbs of time/manner are being used

·        Conjunction “because” emerging  Uses “got” (I got it)

·        “What was, what were,” questions emerging

·        “Was…were” (yes/no questions) emerging (was he there?)

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Refer to Elklan  Tier 2 Level 4 vocabulary list (see MTP) (Teach level 1 to specific children as needed)

·        Well Comm key vocab through assessments.

·        Talk 4 Writing key vocabulary link

·        Specific theme focused words- see other areas.

Enabling Environments

·       See Common Play Behaviours

·        Language rich environment with staff engaging in interactions with children, using back and forth interactions, modelling and challenge including more open ended questioning.

·        Range of more complex books in baskets in provision to enable using books in play – include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·        Weekly ‘Let’s Talk’ time looking at physical objects and pictures to explore developing language and application of language- using adjectives and joining sentences ie because.

·        Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Reading frequently to children providing them with a range of high quality texts focusing key texts linked to reading spine and T4W (see overview)- daily story time. include EAL books including those recorded in different languages.

·        Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

·        Providing the children with a range of opportunities to use and embed new words ie talking times, awe and wonder sessions, let’s celebrate

·        Specific teaching of key vocabulary, adults modelling and narrating play.

·        Differentiated visual symbols for representation – Makaton symbols.

·        Daily singing including the use of Nursery Rhyme Progression – 5 little speckled frogs, Little Bo Peep (first verse), Miss Polly had a Dolly, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Once I Caught a Fish Alive, 5 little ducks, See Saw, Open shut them Here we go round the mulberry bush.

·        Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

·        Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

·        Range of differentiated musical instruments.

·         Set up shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking, or stories that can be re-enacted (T4W)

·        Provide practical experiences that encourage children to talk to each other, ask and respond to questions.

·        Provide story maps (T4W) for children to retell familiar stories.

End of Year

·        Around the age of 4, am I using sentences of four to six words – “I want to play with cars” or “What’s that thing called?”

·        Can I use sentences have joined up with words like ‘because’, ‘or’, ‘and’? For example: “I like ice cream because it makes my tongue shiver”.

·        Am I using the future and past tense: “I am going to the park” and “I went to the shop”? Can I answer simple ‘why’ questions?

·        Can I sing a large repertoire of songs?

·        Have I developed my pronunciation but may have problems saying some sounds: r, j, th, ch, and sh and  multi-syllabic words such as ‘pterodactyl’, ‘planetarium’ or ‘hippopotamus’.

Reception
Baseline

·        Around the age of 4, am I using sentences of four to six words – “I want to play with cars” or “What’s that thing called?”

·        Can I use sentences have joined up with words like ‘because’, ‘or’, ‘and’? For example: “I like ice cream because it makes my tongue shiver”.

·        Am I using the future and past tense: “I am going to the park” and “I went to the shop”? Can I answer simple ‘why’ questions?

·        Can I sing a large repertoire of songs?

·        Have I developed my pronunciation but may have problems saying: • some sounds: r, j, th, ch, and sh • multi-syllabic words such as ‘pterodactyl’, ‘planetarium’ or ‘hippopotamus’.

Skills and Knowledge

Listening, Attention and Understanding:

Social rules of listening:

(Autumn 1)

·        Able to look and listen when an adult is speaking

·        Beginning to show what good listeners do- eyes looking, ears listening, sitting still and quiet for a short amount of time (5-10 minutes)

(Autumn 2)

·        Raises hand to speak during carpet sessions.

·        Takes turns talking to an adult.

·        Understands the expectations of listening carefully – Will maintain eye contact with speaker whilst listening, will show that they are listening by giving their full attention.

Listening to what is read with understanding:

(Autumn 1)

·        Able to listen to a story that is age appropriate and repetitive.

·        Able to identify characters in a story.

(Autumn 2)

·        Joins in with stories and rhymes they like.

·        Follow a story with props and pictures to support.

·        Begins to learn and use new vocabulary with support

Listening, retelling and recounting and performing.

(Autumn 1)

·        Can remember what happens in a story.

·        Listens to and will join in with repetitive songs and rhymes.

(Autumn 2)

·        Begins to retell stories in their play.

·        Learns songs as a whole class to present to others.

·        Begins to repeat familiar refrains in stories.

 

Listening and learning

(Autumn 1)

·        Responds appropriately to simple questions.

(Autumn 2)

·        Can answer simple questions.

 

Listening to following instructions

(Autumn 1)

·        Follows one step instructions.

(Autumn 2)

·        Follow simple two step instructions.

·        Respond to own name and will change activity when encouraged by adults.

 

Speaking:

Voice (Physical):

(Autumn 1)

·        Will interact using their voice.

(Autumn 2)

·        Has confidence to express themselves using their voice.

Social rules of speaking:

(Autumn 1)

·     Greets adults in the setting politely and looking at them.

·    Looks at someone when they are being spoken to.

(Autumn 2)

·    Uses their manners when speaking to adults in the classroom setting.

·     Raises hand to speak during carpet sessions.

 

Retelling and recounting and performing:

(Autumn 1)

·     Will listen to longer stories and join in with familiar refrains; can remember what happens.

·     Listens to songs with repetition and joins in.

(Autumn 2)

·    Begins to retell stories in their play.

·    Learns songs as a whole class to present to others.

 

Speaking for a purpose (Content – Cognitive):

(Autumn 1)

(Autumn 2)

·        Explains something using simple sentences, including ordering, stating what happened and what might happen.

·    Begins to use words to organise and sequence events.

 

Sentence structure/ grammar (Linguistic):

(Autumn 1)

·    Use sentences that are well formed. (However, they may still have some difficulties with grammar. For example,

·    saying ‘sheeps’ instead of ‘sheep’ or ‘goed’ instead of ‘went‘)

(Autumn 2)

·    Starting to link simple sentences.

·    Uses some irregular plural nouns, e.g., ‘men’, ‘teeth’.

 

Vocabulary (Linguistic)

(Autumn 1)

·    Copies and practices and explores the meaning of new vocabulary taken from topics stories and non-fiction texts.

(Autumn 2)

·    Uses new vocabulary / phrases in play and communication throughout the day.

 

Key Vocabulary

·       The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development

·        Refer to Neli vocabulary list. (Key children will be working within the Neli programme. Key vocabulary will be used throughout teaching the whole class to ensure understanding and reinforce teaching)

·        Talk4Writing key vocabulary and progression link

Enabling Environments

– See Common Play Behaviour documents

Language rich environment with staff engaging in back-and-forth interactions with children throughout all parts of the day. Staff will model and encourage continued and developed conversations, e.g. open-ended questions.

Staff read frequently to children and engage them actively in stories, and rhymes, and then provide them with extensive opportunities to use and embed new words in a range of contexts.

– Differentiated visual symbols for representation  Makaton symbols, ‘my turn, your turn’ actions (RWI)

– Include EAL books. (Some recorded in different languages)

– Key vocabulary displayed in all areas of the classroom with matching pictures as appropriate..

– Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

–  Daily singing including Nursery Rhyme progression and phonics:

Autumn 1- Nursery Rhymes- Pat-a-cake, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Once I Caught a Fish Alive, This Old Man, Five Little Ducks

Autumn 1- Action Songs- Name Song, Things For Fingers

Autumn 2- Nursery Rhymes- I’m A Little Teapot, The Grand Old Duke Of York, Ring O’ Roses, Hickory Dickory Dock.

Autumn 2- Action Songs- Not Too Difficult, The ABC Song

– Display pictures and photographs showing engaging, familiar or fantastical events, objects and activities and talk about them with the children.

– Use of repetitive stories and games to use with the children to encourage correct use of vocabulary.

– Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

Use of differentiated objects of reference- more complex as children’s skills progress.

– Familiar role-play to encourage confidence building and language development.

– Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

– Set up shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking, or stories that can be re-enacted (T4W)

– Provide practical experiences that encourage children to talk to each other, ask and respond to questions.

– Provide story maps (T4W) for children to retell familiar stories.

– Range of differentiated musical instruments.

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Do I understand how to listen carefully and why listening is important?

·        Can I describe events in some detail?

·        Am I developing social phrases?

·        Do I engage in story times?

·        Do I listen carefully to rhymes and songs, paying attention to how they sound?

·        Do I learn rhymes, poems and songs?

Skills and Knowledge

Listening, Attention and Understanding:

Social rules of listening:

(Spring 1)

·        Waits their turn when an adult is speaking to someone else in the environment with support.

·        Understand why listening is important.

·        Take turns talking to a friend in the environment.

(Spring 2)

·        Plays and listens to friends at the same time.

·        Show that you have listened by commenting on something that has been said.

Listening to what is read with understanding:

(Spring 1)

·        Engages in story time / non-fiction and make comments about what is happening.

·        Listens to and talks about books, applying new knowledge and vocabulary.

(Spring 2)

·        Remembers key points from a story told without props or pictures.

Listening, retelling and recounting and performing.

(Spring 1)

·        Take on different roles in their play

·        Acts out familiar stories in their own play.

·        Learns rhymes and poems in small groups.

·        Shows preference for favourite stories.

(Spring 2)

·        Innovate stories into their own play.

·        Listens carefully to rhymes poems, and songs, paying attention to how they sound.

·        Learn rhymes, poems and songs.

·        Understands rhyme and makes up their own e.g. Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty kicked a ball.

 

Listening and learning

(Spring 1)

(Spring 2)

·        Can answer more complex questions.

 

Listening to following instructions

(Spring 1)

·        Follows two step instructions that include prepositions.

(Spring 2)

·        Respond to a string of requests one after another (not quickly)

 

Speaking:

Voice (Physical):

(Spring 1)

·     Able to pronounce most phonemes accurately.

(Spring 2)

·     Speak at an appropriate volume.

 

Social rules of speaking:

(Spring 1)

·     Contribute to a group discussion.

(Spring 2)

·    Waits their turn when an adult is speaking to someone else in the environment with support.

·    Uses their manners when speaking to peers and other adults in the school environment.

·    Develops social phrases e.g. Good Morning.  How are you?

 

Retelling and recounting and performing:

(Spring 1)

·    Take on different roles in their play.

·    Acts out familiar stories in their own play.

·    Learns rhymes and poems in small groups.

(Spring 2)

·    Innovate stories into their own everyday play.

·    Learn rhymes, poems and songs.

·    Actively engages in story time.

 

Speaking for a purpose (Content – Cognitive):

(Spring 1)

·    Uses observations in their speech to clarify meaning or give simple detail.

(Spring 2)

·    Plan what they will say before starting to converse.

·    Uses words accurately to organise and sequence events.

 

Sentence structure/ grammar (Linguistic):

(Spring 1)

·    Ask questions to check they understand what has been said to them.

·    Beginning to use and describe in the present tense when something is happening.

(Spring 2)

·    Beginning to use and describe in past tense something that has happened.

 

Vocabulary (Linguistic)

(Spring 1)

·    Uses language to create a story in imaginative play.

·    Explores new vocabulary, sounds and intonation.

·    Vocabulary starts to include a wider range of simple adjectives.

(Spring 2)

·    Applies new vocabulary in their play/imaginary play and new contexts.

·    Use new vocabulary in different contexts.

 

Key Vocabulary

The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development

·        Refer to Neli vocabulary list. (Key children will be working within the Neli programme. Key vocabulary will be used throughout teaching the whole class to ensure understanding and reinforce teaching)

Enabling Environments

– See Common Play Behaviour documents

Staff comment on what children are interested in or doing (through observation and knowledge of children) and recast language.

– Staff continue to develop the frequency and quality of the conversations they have with the children throughout the day in the language-rich environment.

Staff allow children to thrive by focussing n and embedding an early love of reading.

– Staff read frequently to children, and engage them actively in non- fiction and poems, and then provide them with extensive opportunities to use and embed new words in a range of context, will give children the opportunity to thrive.

– Differentiated visual symbols for representation  Makaton symbols, ‘my turn, your turn’ actions (RWI)

– Include EAL books. (Some recorded in different languages)

– Key vocabulary displayed in all areas of the classroom with matching pictures as appropriate.

– Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

–  Daily singing including Nursery Rhyme progression and phonics:

Spring 1- Nursery Rhymes- Wind The Bobbin Up, Rock-a-bye Baby, Five Little Monkeys Jumping On The Bed, Twinkle Twinkle

Spring 1- Action Songs- If You’re Happy And You Know It, Head, Shoulders, Knees And Toes

Spring 2- Nursery Rhymes- Old Macdonald, Incy Wincy Spider, Baa Baa Black Sheep, Row, Row, Row Your Boat

Spring 2- Action Songs- The Wheels On The Bus, The Hokey Cokey

– Act out familiar stories (including T4W)

– Use different voices to maintain attention and encourage listening. – Repeat after me games- deep voice, whisper etc.

– Talk about the similarities in rhyming words and create own rhymes e.g. Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall, Humpty Dumpty kicked a ball.

– Play rhyming games, What rhymes with…. ?

– Provide opportunities for children to make predictions and order events. Allow children to use props and materials to support.

– Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

Use of differentiated objects of reference- more complex as children’s skills progress.

– Role-play to encourage confidence building, language development and new experiences.

– Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

– Set up shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking, or stories that can be re-enacted (T4W)

– Provide practical experiences that encourage children to talk to each other, ask and respond to questions and recall events using past tense.

– Provide story maps (T4W) and props for children to retell familiar stories.

– Range of differentiated musical instruments.

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Do I learn new vocabulary?

·        Can I use new vocabulary through the day?

·        Do I ask questions to find out more and to check I understand what has been said to me?

·        Can I articulate my ideas and thoughts in well-formed sentences?

·        Can I connect one idea or action to another using a range of connectives?

·        Can I use talk to help work out problems and organise thinking and activities, and to explain how things work and why they might happen?

·        Can I listen to and talk about stories to build familiarity and understanding?

·        Can I retell the story, once I have developed a deep familiarity with the text, some as exact repetition and some in my own words?

·        Can I use new vocabulary in different contexts?

·        Can I engage in non-fiction books?

·        Can I listen to and talk about selected non-fiction to develop a deep familiarity with new knowledge and vocabulary?

Skills and Knowledge

Listening, Attention and Understanding:

Social rules of listening:

(Summer 1)

-Show that they have listened by adding to something the speaker has said.

– Decide whether they agree or not with the points made by the speaker.

Responds to other children’s opinions.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Listen attentively and respond to what they hear with relevant questions, comments and actions when being read to and during whole class discussions and small group interaction.

– Hold conversation when engaged in back and forth exchanges with their teacher and peers.

Listening to what is read with understanding:

(Summer 1)

– Build a picture in the mind about the story (and expresses this)

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Listen attentively and respond to what they hear with relevant questions, comments, and actions when being read to and during whole class discussions and small group interaction.

Listening, retelling and recounting and performing.

(Summer 1)

– Listens to and talks about stories to build familiarity and understanding.

– Retell the story, once they have developed a deep familiarity with the text; some with exact repetition and some in their words.

– Listen to and talk about selected non-fiction to develop a deep familiarity with new knowledge and vocabulary.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Listen attentively and respond to what they hear with relevant questions, comments and actions when being read to and during whole class discussions and small group interaction.

– Performs a range of rhymes, poems and songs off-by-heart (from memory).

 

Listening and learning

(Summer 1)

– Can use simple questions.

– Ask question to find out more and to check they understand what has been said to them.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Make comments about what they have heard and ask questions to clarify their understanding.

Listening to following instructions

(Summer 1)

–  Follow a series of instructions directed to them as a group.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Listen attentively and respond to what they hear.

 

Speaking:

Voice (Physical):

(Summer 1)

– Explores new vocabulary, sounds and intonation.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

 

Social rules of speaking:

(Summer 1)

– Responds to others by building on what the speaker has said.

– Contribute purposefully to a class discussion.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Participates in small group, class and one to one discussions, offering their own ideas, using recently introduced vocabulary;

 

Retelling and recounting and performing:

(Summer 1)

– Listen to and talk about stories to build familiarity and understanding.

– Retell the story, once they have developed a deep familiarity with the text; some with exact repetition and some in their own words.

– Listen to and talk about selected non-fiction to develop a deep familiarity with new knowledge and vocabulary.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Offer explanations for why things might happen, making use of recently introduced vocabulary from stories, non-fiction, rhymes and poems when appropriate.

 

Speaking for a purpose (Content – Cognitive):

(Summer 1)

– Describe events with some detail.

– Use talk to help work out problems and organise thinking and activities explain how things work and why they might happen.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Express their ideas and feeling about their experiences using full sentences including use of past, present and future tenses and making use of conjunctions, with modelling and support from their teacher.

 

Sentence structure/ grammar (Linguistic):

(Summer 1)

– Articulate their ideas and thoughts in well-formed sentences.

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

– Express their ideas and feeling about their experiences using full sentences including use of past, present and future tenses and making use of conjunctions, with modelling and support from their teacher.

 

Vocabulary (Linguistic)

(Summer 1)

(Summer 2) – (ELG)

Offer explanations for why things might happen, making use of recently introduced vocabulary from stories, non- fiction, rhymes and poems when appropriate;

 

Key Vocabulary

The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development

Refer to Neli vocabulary list. (Key children will be working within the Neli programme. Key vocabulary will be used throughout teaching the whole class to ensure understanding and reinforce teaching)

Enabling Environments

– See Common Play Behaviour documents

Children engage in conversation, story-telling and role play and share their ideas with support and modelling from their teacher, and sensitive questioning that invites them to elaborate to deepen their language development.

– Differentiated visual symbols for representation  Makaton symbols, ‘my turn, your turn’ actions (RWI)

– Include EAL books. (Some recorded in different languages)

– Key vocabulary displayed in all areas of the classroom with matching pictures as appropriate.

– Use of sound buttons and technology to promote listening, understanding and conversation.

–  Daily singing including Nursery Rhyme progression and phonics:

Summer 1- Nursery Rhymes- Three blind mice, 10 in the bed, The animals went in two by two, The Farmer’s in his Den

Summer 1- Action Songs- A sailor went to see, When I was one…

Summer 2- Nursery Rhymes- Frere Jacques, London Bridge, Sing a song of sixpence, 10 green bottles

Summer 2- Action Songs- The penguin song, Down in the jungle

– Act out familiar stories (including T4W)

– Provide activities that involve team work – support children to work collaboratively- listening and responding to peers, sharing ideas and opinions.

– Review activities and encourage children to discuss the strategies used and whether they would do anything differently next time. Encourage the children to use any key vocabulary.

– Provide opportunities to talk about events, using past, present and future tenses.

– Provide opportunities for children to participate in meaningful speaking and listening activities. E.g. children can show models that they have made to others and explain how they were made.

– Key vocabulary (amended to meet need each term) displayed in provision including purposeful vocabulary ie labels on jars etc.

Use of differentiated objects of reference- more complex as children’s skills progress.

– Role-play to encourage confidence building, language development and new experiences.

– Provide a range of differentiated resources to enable communication ie puppets, role play, small world.

– Set up shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking, or stories that can be re-enacted (T4W)

– Provide story maps (T4W) and props for children to retell familiar stories.

– Range of differentiated musical instruments.

 

ELGS

Listening and Attention

– Listen attentively and respond to what they hear with relevant questions, comments and actions when being read to and during whole class discussions and small group interactions;

– Make comments about what they have heard and ask questions to clarify their understanding;

– Hold conversation when engaged in back-and-forth exchanges with their teacher and peers.

Speaking

-Participate in small group, class and one-to-one discussions, offering their own ideas, using recently introduced vocabulary;

– Offer explanations for why things might happen, making use of recently introduced vocabulary from stories, non-fiction, rhymes and poems when appropriate;

– Express their ideas and feelings about their experiences using full sentences, including use of past, present and future tenses and making use of conjunctions, with modelling and support from their teacher.

 

Personal, Social and Emotional Development
Children’s personal, social and emotional development (PSED) is crucial for children to lead healthy and happy lives, and is fundamental to their cognitive development. Underpinning their personal development are the important attachments that shape their social world. Strong, warm and supportive 9 relationships with adults enable children to learn how to understand their own feelings and those of others. Children should be supported to manage emotions, develop a positive sense of self, set themselves simple goals, have confidence in their own abilities, to persist and wait for what they want and direct attention as necessary. Through adult modelling and guidance, they will learn how to look after their bodies, including healthy eating, and manage personal needs independently. Through supported interaction with other children, they learn how to make good friendships, co-operate and resolve conflicts peaceably. These attributes will provide a secure platform from which children can achieve at school and in later life.

 

Setting Specific Goals
Risk Taking– to be confident in taking risks.  (See also physical skills ie real tools)
First MilestoneSecond MilestoneThird MilestoneFinal Milestone
·        I can begin to demonstrate an understanding of risk (ie I know I may fall from a tree and I seek an adult to help me manage this risk).

 

·        I begin to show more independence in taking my own risks

·        (ie explore resources and environment independently.

·        Begin to start to climb- starting with steps.)

 

 

·        I can confidently take risks in my own environment.·        I expand my own comfort zones and take managed risks on a daily, weekly and monthly basis.

 

·        (ie confidently climb to heights above my own, take risks in play- and try new things with confidence)

Characteristics of Effective Learning
Children will be engaged in: playing and exploring (children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’; active learning (children will concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter any difficulties, and enjoy achievements); creating and thinking critically (children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things)
2-3 Year Olds
Baseline

·        Around the age of 2, do I see myself as a separate person? For example, do I decide what to play with, what to eat, what to wear?

·        Can I enjoy simple make believe ie drinking a cup of tea?

·        Can I show big emotions ie jumping up and down when excited?

Skills

·        Begin to be aware of rules and boundaries, beginning to follow routines such as sitting the carpet and knowing when to stop.

·        Finding ways to manage transitions ie from parent to key person.

·        Begin to select what they want to play with independently in their areas of interest.

·        Begin to indicate either verbally or physically, their preferences and decisions.

·        Begin to verbalise or physically indicate their preferred choice of foods at snack time.

·        Beginning to know where their arms go in a coat and how to take off their shoes.

·        Beginning to be able to express a range of emotions.

·        Playing with increasing confidence near to other children.

·        Sometimes tries to communicate with other children around them.

·        Begin to be able to know how to brush their teeth with adult support.

·        Begin to notice that everyone is different in terms of physical features.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Refer to CL (Elklan)

·        Vocabulary relating to routine- sit, carpet time, words to hello song (staff to use some key words in children’s home languages)

·        Friends, play.

·        Emotions- Happy, sad

·        Food names- banana, apple

·        Clothing names- coat and shoes

 

Enabling Environments

·        Key Person assigned to children to support with transitions and routines and develop strong relationships with children- opportunities planned for children to be with their key person (focus weeks and other sessions)

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Environment organised to give spaces for children to play on their own, alongside others or with others as they choose- adapted termly according to needs of children.

·        Range of engaging resources- linking in with children’s interests gained from home visits.

·        Objects of reference/ visual cues to support verbalising.

·        Regular adult led sessions supporting understanding of emotions and self-regulation.

·        Adult modelling and support with clothing- teaching the Montessori way of putting coats on- using narrative and verbal prompting.

·        Sharing books with different representations of family structure.

·        Support with handwashing- visual representations and adult support.

·        Daily teeth cleaning sessions with adult support.

·        Regular opportunities to play independently and with others.

·        Books, puppets, dolls and small world that support children in exploring relationships with others.

·        Mirrors and photographs of children, families in the setting.

·        Home corner and role play linked to home experiences- enhanced with materials reflecting family’s lives.

·        Create familiar, predictable routines.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Am I more confident in independently selecting resources and choosing my own food?

·        Am I beginning to try to put on my own clothes, ie trying to put my own arm in their coat or taking off my shoes/ socks when I want to?

·        Am I aware of other children around me?

·        Can I begin to show some emotions?

·        Am I able to begin follow simple routines with adult support?

·        Am I able to follow simple hygiene routines with adult support? (cleaning teeth and washing hands)

Skills

·        Developing play with other children- able to initiate interactions with others ie greetings and show recognition that others are nearby.

·        Begin to show ‘effortful control’ ie waiting for a turn and resisting the strong impulse to grab what they want or push their way to the front.

·        May recognise that some actions can hurt others.

·        Be more confident in the following of rules and boundaries throughout the session.

·        Confidently play independently in their areas of interest- can choose their own resources from those available in each area.

·        Indicate more confidently either verbally or physically, their preferences and decisions.

·        Beginning to try to put on their coat more independently (ie puts an arm in a sleeve or tries to put their foot in a shoe)

·        Developing their expression of new emotions beyond happy and sad.

·        Playing with increasing confidence alongside other children engaged in the same activity.

·        Often tries to communicate with other children around them.

·        Able to begin to know where items belong and return them during key tidy times, with adult support.

·        More confidently brush their teeth with adult support.

·        Begin to recognise that others speak different languages and may look different to them.

Key Vocabulary

·       The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·       See  CL- Elkan

·        Vocabulary relating to routine- tidy up time, story time, home time, hello song

·        Friends’ names

·        Emotions- angry, tired, excited

·        Food names- pear, carrot, pea

·        Clothing names- jumper, trousers, skirt, pants, socks

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school sessions

·        Regular opportunities to explore emotions through play and story contexts

·        Continue to develop further enhanced relationships with key person- further opportunities planned for children to be with their key person beyond focus weeks.

·        Environment organised to give spaces for children to play on their own, alongside others or with others as they choose- adapted termly according to needs of children.

·        Range of engaging resources- linking in with children’s interests gained from previous term and needs.

·        Objects of reference/ visual cues to support verbalising- differentiated according to need.

·        Regular adult led sessions supporting understanding of emotions and self-regulation.

·        Adult modelling and support with clothing- reminders of strategy and support with zips and orientation.

·        Sharing books linked into area of focus- ie key emotion.

·        Daily teeth cleaning sessions with adult support.

·        Regular opportunities to play independently and with others, supported by adults where necessary.

·        Regular tidy up times and support from adults to reinforce and remind.

·         Differentiated books, puppets, dolls and small world that support children in exploring relationships with others.

·        Photos of children in setting in different contexts.

·        Home corner and role play linked to settings within their own experience.

·        Maintain familiar, predictable routines.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Am I more aware of other children around me and often look to other children to play near to or next to me, sometimes attempting some play interactions?

·        Am I confidently selecting my own resources?

·        Do I like to help put things away ie shopping?

·        Do I start to challenge boundaries?

·        Can I confidently follow simple routines?

·        Can I more confidently brush my teeth and wash my hands?

·        Am I able to express a wider range of emotions?

Skills

·        Developing play with other children- able to initiate interactions with others ie greetings and show recognition that others are nearby.

·        Able to confidently show ‘effortful control’ ie waiting for a turn and resisting the strong impulse to grab what they want or push their way to the front.

·        Knows that some words and actions can hurt others’ feelings.

·        Able to consistently following of rules and boundaries throughout the session.

·        Confidently play independently in all areas of the setting.

·        Verbally explain their preference or reasons.

·        Able to try to put their coat on independently.

·        Able to express a range of emotions.

·        Able to play with other children in simple play interactions- alongside or parallel play but with some interaction between them.

·        Usually tries to communicate with other children around them.

·        Able to confidently return several items to their homes during tidy up time.

·        More confidently brush their teeth with less adult support.

·        Talk about the differences they see in others and similarities between themselves and others.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Take turns, wait

·        Emotions- previous plus key emotions for each child

·        Food names relevant to snack time

·        Clothing names- buttons, zips, sleeves, legs

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Regular opportunities to explore emotions through play and story contexts

·        Continue to develop further enhanced relationships with key person- further opportunities planned for children to be with their key person beyond focus weeks.

·        Environment organised to give spaces for children to play on their own, alongside others or with others as they choose- adapted termly according to needs of children.

·        Range of engaging resources- linking in with children’s interests gained from previous term and needs.

·        Objects of reference/ visual cues to support verbalising- differentiated according to need.

·        Regular adult led sessions supporting understanding of emotions and self-regulation.

·        Adult modelling and support with clothing- reminders of strategy and support with zips and orientation.

·        Sharing books linked into area of focus- ie key emotion.

·        Daily teeth cleaning sessions with adult support.

·        Regular opportunities to play independently and with others, developing further skills linked to turn taking and negotiation with others, supported by adults where necessary.

·        Regular tidy up times and support from adults to reinforce and remind and further develop independence in this area.

·         Differentiated books, puppets, dolls and small world that support children in exploring relationships with others.

·        Photos of children in setting in different contexts.

·        Home corner and role play linked to settings within their own experience- developing widening experiences through role play- awareness of cultures around them.

·        Continue to maintain familiar, predictable routines.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

End of Year

·        Between the ages of 2 and 3, am I starting to enjoy the company of other children and want to play with them?

·        Can I sometimes manage to share or take turns with others, with adult guidance and understanding ‘yours’ and ‘mine’? Can I settle to some activities for a while?

·        Can I clean my teeth and wash my hands more independently?

·        Can I confidently talk about my emotions?

·        Can I confidently follow simple routines?

3-4 Year Olds
Baseline

·        Between the ages of 2 and 3, am I starting to enjoy the company of other children and want to play with them?

·        Can I sometimes manage to share or take turns with others, with adult guidance and understanding ‘yours’ and ‘mine’? Can I settle to some activities for a while?

 

·        Play with increasing confidence on their own and with other children- because they know their key person is nearby and available.

·        Feel confident exploring new places with their key person.

·        Is able to show ‘effortful control’. For example, waiting for a turn and resisting the strong impulse to grab what they want or push their way to the front (starting to show effortful control – and be aware of rules/boundaries)

·        Able to select and use resources around the classroom that are appropriate for their play.

·        Able to follow simple rules at the beginning and end of day.

·        Able to explain to others how they are feeling using key emotion words (sometimes using gestures or home language)

·        Able to show an awareness of others around them (through gesture/ talk/ action) May use home language to try to interact.

·        Begin to develop friendships with their peers.

·        Able to usually put their coat on independently.

·        Able to clean teeth with the support of an adult.

·        Able to recognise the differences in others and talk about what makes them and others special.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Emotions- key emotions ie happy, sad, excited, cross.

·        Friends

·        Turn taking, rules, carpet time, home time, snack time, wash hands, coat on, sit down (language linked to routine)

·        Greetings (in different languages)

·        Key resource names and names of key areas- differentiated according to need.

·        Coat, shoes, trousers, skirt, top, jumper, hat, gloves.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Regular opportunities to explore emotions through play and story contexts

·        Develop opportunities for developing attachments with adults, specifically their key person.

·        Environment organised to give spaces for children to play on their own, alongside others or with others as they choose- adapted termly according to needs of children.

·        Range of engaging resources- linking in with children’s interests gained from previous term and needs.

·        Objects of reference/ visual cues to support verbalising- differentiated according to need.

·        Regular adult led sessions supporting understanding of emotions and self-regulation.

·        Adult modelling with clothing and positive reinforcement.

·        Daily teeth cleaning sessions with adult support.

·        Regular opportunities to play independently and with others, developing further skills to interact with peers.

·        Regular tidy up times and support from adults –building independence in care of the environment.

·        Differentiated books, puppets, dolls and small world that support children in exploring relationships with others.

·        Photos of children in setting in different contexts.

·       Home corner and role play linked to settings within their own experience- linked to home and places within their recent experiences.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I select and use activities and resources, with help when needed. This helps them to achieve a goal they have chosen, or one which is suggested to them.

·        Can I remember rules without needing an adult to remind me?

·        Can I talk about my feelings using words like ‘happy’, ‘sad’, ‘angry’ or ‘worried’?

·        Can I begin to dress and undress including usually putting my coat on?

 

Skills

·        Be increasingly able to talk about and manage their emotions

·        Select resources with increasing independence in order to achieve their own goal.

·        Develop their own responsibility and develop skills as a member of their community.

·        Become more outgoing with unfamiliar people in the Nursery setting.

·        Show confidence in new social settings.

·        Develop friendships with other children, playing with one or more children and extending their play ideas.

·        Safely explore emotions beyond their normal range through play and stories.

·        Able to start to eat independently and begin to use a knife and fork.

·        Increasingly following rules, starting to understand why they are important.

·        Able to sometimes talk about an issue with a friend to solve conflict, with adult support.

·        Able to independently clean their teeth and wash and dry their hands.

·        Make healthy choices about food, drink and activity, with adult support.

·        Able to talk about special qualities in others and begin to understand that physical differences are only skin deep.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Words to explain emotions- because, I feel, I am and more complex emotions linked to child’s need ie excited, worried, tired.

·        Language to communicate- words to make relationships with other children- ie will you play with me? Next?

·        Key resource names and names of key areas- differentiated according to need.

·        Fork, knife, eat, clothing including socks, straps, zips, buttons, toothbrush, toothpaste, brush, clean, water, wash, dry.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Regular opportunities to explore emotions through play and story contexts and to talk about their emotions in ‘in the moment’ and planned sessions.

·        Develop further opportunities for developing attachments with adults, specifically their key person.

·        Environment organised to give spaces for children to play on their own, alongside others or with others as they choose- adapted termly according to needs of children.

·        Range of engaging resources- linking in with children’s interests gained from previous term and needs.

·        Objects of reference/ visual cues to support verbalising- differentiated according to need.

·        Regular adult led sessions supporting understanding of emotions and self-regulation and opportunities to talk about their emotions and explore these further.

·        Adult modelling with clothing and positive reinforcement.

·        Daily teeth cleaning sessions with adult support.

·        Opportunities to engage with using knives and forks- both in play and in purposeful provision linked to eating.

·        Regular opportunities to play independently and with others, developing further skills to interact with peers including resolving conflict.

·        Regular tidy up times and support from adults –building independence in care of the environment.

·        Differentiated books, puppets, dolls and small world that support children in exploring relationships with others and a range of emotions.

·        Photos of children in setting in different contexts.

·       Home corner and role play linked to settings within their own experience- linked to home and places within their community and within first hand experiences.

·       Range of food tasting and making sessions which allow for making healthy choices about food and activity.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Am I becoming more outgoing with unfamiliar people, in the safe context of my own setting?

·        Can I show more confidence in new social situations?

·        Do know what I want to play with and where to find it?

·        Am I developing skills relating to using cutlery and understanding healthy choices?

·        Am I understanding gradually how others might be feeling?

Skills

·        Be able to play in a group of friends and make up ideas of things to do and games to play.

·        Begin to manage their own feelings and talk about emotions to others.

·        Understand how others might be feeling.

·        Independent in meeting own care needs- brushing teeth, using the toilet, washing and drying hands.

·        Be able to be responsible and be a confident part of their own community.

·        Be confident in exploring new settings in preparation for starting school.

·        Begin to find solutions to disagreements with peers independently.

·        Confidently follow rules and routines without adult support or guidance.

·        Able to explain what is healthy in terms of food and drink and begin to suggest some ideas about why this is.

·        Recognise the different cultures and backgrounds that make up their community and show tolerance and understanding of others.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Words to explain ask others about emotions- why, how are you?

·        Language to communicate- words to support dealing with conflict.

·        School, classroom, Reception, community

·        Names of foods including those from other cultures represented in the setting.

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Regular opportunities to explore emotions through play and story contexts and to talk about their emotions in ‘in the moment’ and planned sessions.

·        Develop opportunities for developing attachments with adults in their new provision for Reception.

·        Environment organised to give spaces for children to play on their own, alongside others or with others as they choose- adapted termly according to needs of children.

·        Range of engaging resources- linking in with children’s interests gained from previous term and needs.

·        Regular adult led sessions supporting understanding of emotions and self-regulation and opportunities to talk about the emotions of others, their impact and how to resolve or support others.

·        Daily teeth cleaning sessions with adult support.

·        Opportunities to engage with healthy eating and making healthy food snacks.

·        Regular opportunities to play independently and with others, developing further skills to interact with peers including resolving conflict and play based imaginative skills in a group.

·        Regular tidy up times and support from adults –building independence in care of the environment.

·        Differentiated books, puppets, dolls and small world that support children in exploring relationships with others and a range of emotions.

·        Photos of children in setting in different contexts.

·       Home corner and role play linked to settings within their own experience- linked to home and places within their community and within first hand experiences.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

 

End of Year

Can I develop my sense of responsibility and membership of a community?

Do I play alongside others or do I always want to play alone?

Do I take part in pretend play (for example, being ‘mummy’ or ‘daddy’?)

Do I take part in other pretend play with different roles – being the Gruffalo, for example?

Can I generally negotiate solutions to conflicts in my play?

Am I increasingly independent in meeting my own care needs, e.g. brushing teeth, using the toilet, washing and drying my hands thoroughly.

Do I make healthy choices about food, drink, activity and toothbrushing?

Reception
Baseline

·        Can I develop my sense of responsibility and membership of a community?

·        Do I play alongside others or do I always want to play alone?

·        Do I take part in pretend play (for example, being ‘mummy’ or ‘daddy’?)

·        Do I take part in other pretend play with different roles – being the Gruffalo, for example?

·        Can I generally negotiate solutions to conflicts in my play?

·        Am I increasingly independent in meeting my own care needs, e.g. brushing teeth, using the toilet, washing and drying my hands thoroughly.

·        Do I make healthy choices about food, drink, activity and tooth-brushing?

Skills

·        Build relationships with the new adults and peers in the class.

·        Listen to each other and take turns when communicating and playing.

·        Be able to resolve conflict when it occurs (if needed, with support from an adult).

·        Be confident to explore their new classroom.

·        Be able to talk about feelings; what could happen to cause these emotions?

·        Be able to identify own feelings and begin to manage them appropriately.

·        Be able to understand that their own actions can affect the emotions of others. Can they consider the feelings of others? Can they support others if they have upset them?

·        Be able to independently identify when they need to wash their hands, use the toilet, have a rest, seek support from a friend or an adult when needed.

·        Be able to use brush their teeth properly, remembering the hygiene rules of not touching anybody else’s and to keep the bristles clean.

·        Be able to follow new class rules and routines with an understanding of the need for them.

·        Be able to talk about identify healthy food and give examples of exercise to support a healthy lifestyle.

·        Be able to talk about who is special and what makes them special.

·        Be able to talk about how people may be different because of family dynamics, religion, race and understand that we should respectful regardless of this.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Neli)

·        Possible emotions- happy, sad, angry, worried, nervous, excited, tired, hungry etc

·        How are you feeling? Why are you feeling this way? How can I help?

·        Sorry, help

·        Stem sentence- I feel……because…..

·        Language to communicate- words to support dealing with conflict.

·        School, classroom, Reception, community, friends, family, routine

·        Names of foods including those from other cultures represented in the setting.

·        Healthy, hygiene, germs,

·        Exercise, heartbeat

·        Teeth, brush, bristles, plaque, toothpaste,

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Visual routine displayed

·        Feelings board with opportunity for children to move their name to match their feelings. This means that friends and adults can monitor and check in with the children who are feeling sad or angry to support them with identifying why and how.

·        Decide on a set of class rules as a whole group. Discuss why we need them and what could help the day to day running of class life in Reception.

·        Lots of opportunities for class discussions and circle times. Adults to model taking turns in conversations and support children to do the same. (See CL)

·        Explore different stories that have a focus on emotions.

·        Opportunities for children to explore different faces- mirrors, drawing, painting.

·        Board games to practise turn taking.

·        Daily teeth brushing (after lunch)- Children have the responsibility to collect their brush (without touching anyone else’s or the bristles), scoop the toothpaste, brush their teeth (following the instructions on the ‘Brush Bus’ song), spitting, rinsing and putting their brush away.

·        Some resources limited to support children with sharing and turn taking.

·        Opportunities to engage in healthy snack. Reminders to wash hands before eating at the snack bar.

·        Routines modelled by adults at the start of the term and then encouraged. During tidy up time a song will be played to keep children on task.

·        Use of ‘Go Noodle’ and ‘Cosmic Kids’ to promote mindfulness and provide opportunities to explore emotions.

·        Adults to talk to the children about how they feel and what may cause it.

·        Adults to support children during conflict. Giving them ideas on how to resolve.

·       Home corner and role play linked to settings within their own experience- linked to home and places within their community and within first hand experiences.

·        Emotion wood slices including facial expressions and the written emotion.

·        Photos displaying good examples of children playing in the environment.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

·       Use of our school values to promote positive behaviour.

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I build constructive and respectful relationships?

·        Can I express my feelings and consider the feelings of others?

·        Can I identify and moderate my own feelings socially and emotionally?

·        Can I manage my own needs? – Personal hygiene.

·        Do I know and talk about the different factors that support my overall health and wellbeing: – healthy eating – teeth brushing – having a good sleep routine?

Skills

·        Continue to develop relationships with peers and adults- Gain an understanding of how to be respectful and caring to others.

·        To be able to think of ways to support others if they have caused upset or hurt- E.g Check they are ok after bumping into each other. Apologising when upset.

·        To be able to persevere in an activity when a challenge occurs.

·        To develop resilience when challenges occur. Understanding that sometimes things don’t work out and to try again.

·        To be able to offer ideas and support when a friend is finding an activity challenging.

·        To continue to develop their ability to resolve conflict when it occurs (if needed, with support from an adult).

·        To think about how their feelings can affect others. How would doing a certain thing make others feel?

·        To be able to recognise the importance of limiting screen time.

·        To be able to understand the effects of exercise and good hygiene and why it is important.

·        To be able to identify how to be a safe pedestrian and put it into practise.

·        To be able to identify things that they are good at and how they can help within the classroom and community.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Neli)

·        Possible emotions- happy, sad, angry, worried, nervous, excited, tired, hungry etc

·        How are you feeling? Why are you feeling this way? How can I help?

·        Sorry, help, How can I help? Are you ok? I can get help.

·        Challenge, persevere, resilience.

·        Ideas, I think… Maybe we could… How about….

·        Language to communicate- words to support dealing with conflict.

·        Names of foods including those from other cultures represented in the setting.

·        Computer, tablet, screen, apps, lights, limit

·        Healthy, hygiene, germs,

·        Exercise, heartbeat

·        Teeth, brush, bristles, plaque, toothpaste

Street, road, traffic lights, cars, pedestrian, stop, look, listen, danger, safe, safety, high visibility.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Visual routine displayed

·        Feelings board with opportunity for children to move their name to match their feelings. This means that friends and adults can monitor and check in with the children who are feeling sad or angry to support them with identifying why and how. Can they see how their friends are feeling and discuss?

·        Lots of opportunities for class discussions and circle times. Adults to model taking turns in conversations and support children to do the same. (See CL)

·        Explore different stories that have a focus on emotions, conflict, respect, positivity, confidence.

·        Board games to practise turn taking.

·        Daily teeth brushing (after lunch)- Children have the responsibility to collect their brush (without touching anyone else’s or the bristles), scoop the toothpaste, brush their teeth (following the instructions on the ‘Brush Bus’ song), spitting, rinsing and putting their brush away.

·        Some resources limited to support children with sharing and turn taking.

·        Opportunities to engage in healthy snack. Reminders to wash hands before eating at the snack bar.

·        Routines modelled by adults at the start of the term and then encouraged. During tidy up time a song will be played to keep children on task.

·        Use of ‘Go Noodle’ and ‘Cosmic Kids’ to promote mindfulness and provide opportunities to explore emotions.

·        Adults to prompt group discussions about how they feel and what may cause it. Show a selection of scenarios.

·        Adults to support children during conflict. Giving them ideas on how to resolve. Ask how they could resolve it.

·        Emotion wood slices including facial expressions and the written emotion.

·        Celebration board- Wonder wall – Show children’s work that they are proud of.

·        Photos displaying good examples of children playing in the environment.

·        High visibility jackets for children to role play crossing roads safely.

·        I-pads and timers.

·        Yoga cards, exercise cards and activities to promote a healthy lifestyle.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

·       Use of our school values to promote positive behaviour.

 

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

Do I see myself as a valuable individual?

Do I show resilience and perseverance in the face of challenge?

Do I think about the perspectives of others?

Do I know and talk about the different factors that support my overall health and wellbeing: – regular physical activity – sensible amounts of ‘screen time’ – being a safe pedestrian?

Skills

·        To be able to manage their own feelings successfully. Distracting, exploring or resolving the issue.

·        To be able to persevere to achieve a goal.

·        To follow the class rules regarding behaviour within the setting and applying it outside too.

·        To listen to others, follow instructions and change behaviour even when engaged in another activity.

·        To be able to talk about why a healthy lifestyle and good hygiene is so important.

·        To demonstrate positive relationships within the class and setting, understanding and taking into consideration the feelings of others.

·        To confidently demonstrate the ability to take turns and play cooperatively with others.

To be able to dress themselves, and manage their own personal needs.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Neli)

·        Possible emotions- happy, sad, angry, worried, nervous, excited, tired, hungry etc

·        How are you feeling? Why are you feeling this way? How can I help?, sensitive, aware, understanding.

·        Sorry, help, How can I help? Are you ok? I can get help.

·        Challenge, persevere, resilience. Confidence, focus

·        Ideas, I think… Maybe we could… How about….

·        Language to communicate- words to support dealing with conflict.

·        Names of foods including those from other cultures represented in the setting.

·        Computer, tablet, screen, apps, lights, limit

·        Healthy, hygiene, germs,

·        Exercise, heartbeat

·        Teeth, brush, bristles, plaque, toothpaste

Rules, routines, safe, kind, values, choices

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Visual routine displayed

·        Feelings board with opportunity for children to move their name to match their feelings. This means that friends and adults can monitor and check in with the children who are feeling sad or angry to support them with identifying why and how. Can they see how their friends are feeling and discuss?

·        Lots of opportunities for class discussions and circle times. Adults to model taking turns in conversations and support children to do the same. (See CL)

·        Explore different stories that have a focus on emotions, conflict, respect, positivity, confidence.

·        Board games to practise turn taking.

·        Daily teeth brushing (after lunch)- Children have the responsibility to collect their brush (without touching anyone else’s or the bristles), scoop the toothpaste, brush their teeth (following the instructions on the ‘Brush Bus’ song), spitting, rinsing and putting their brush away.

·        Some resources limited to support children with sharing and turn taking.

·        Opportunities to engage in healthy snack. Reminders to wash hands before eating at the snack bar.

·        Use of ‘Go Noodle’ and ‘Cosmic Kids’ to promote mindfulness and provide opportunities to explore emotions and promote exercise.

·        Adults to prompt group discussions about how they feel and what may cause it. Show a selection of scenarios.

·        Adults to support children during conflict. Giving them ideas on how to resolve. Ask how they could resolve it.

·        Emotion wood slices including facial expressions and the written emotion.

·        Celebration board- Wonder wall – Show children’s work that they are proud of.

·        Photos displaying good examples of children playing in the environment.

·        I-pads and timers.

·        Yoga cards, exercise cards and activities to promote a healthy lifestyle.

·       Cultures and backgrounds in the community represented in the setting through celebrations, objects, books and other cultural references.

·       Perseverance phrases- If at first you don’t succeed, try, try and try again. Team work makes the dream work etc.

·       Use of our school values to promote positive behaviour.

 

ELG

Self-Regulation

– Show an understanding of their own feelings and those of others, and begin to regulate their behaviour accordingly;

– Set and work towards simple goals, being able to wait for what they want and control their immediate impulses when appropriate;

– Give focused attention to what the teacher says, responding appropriately even when engaged in activity, and show an ability to follow instructions involving several ideas or actions.

Managing Self

– Be confident to try new activities and show independence, resilience and perseverance in the face of challenge;

– Explain the reasons for rules, know right from wrong and try to behave accordingly; – Manage their own basic hygiene and personal needs, including dressing, going to the toilet and understanding the importance of healthy food choices.

Building Relationships

– Work and play cooperatively and take turns with others;

– Form positive attachments to adults and friendships with peers;

– Show sensitivity to their own and to others’ needs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Physical Development
Physical activity is vital in children’s all-round development, enabling them to pursue happy, healthy and active lives. Gross and fine motor experiences develop incrementally throughout early childhood, starting with sensory explorations and the development of a child’s strength, co-ordination and positional awareness through tummy time, crawling and play movement with both objects and adults. By creating games and providing opportunities for play both indoors and outdoors, adults can support children to develop their core strength, stability, balance, spatial awareness, co-ordination and agility. Gross motor skills provide the foundation for developing healthy bodies and social and emotional well-being. Fine motor control and precision helps with hand-eye co-ordination, which is later linked to early literacy. Repeated and varied opportunities to explore and play with small world activities, puzzles, arts and crafts and the practice of using small tools, with feedback and support from adults, allow children to develop proficiency, control and confidence.

 

Setting Specific Goal
Physical Skills- Co-ordination skills in order to be able to ride a bike, climb trees, balance, jump and explore their space and to be able to use real tools to design and build their own creations.

 

 

First MilestoneSecond MilestoneThird MilestoneFinal Milestone
·        I can explore using one-handed tools such as: one-handed scissors, knives to spread/cut and wooden spoons to stir/pour.

·        I can sit on a trike with good balance and scoot along and begin to pedal.

 

·        I can confidently use one-handed tools to create changes in materials e.g. Use a peeler at forest school to whittle the bark of a stick.

·        I can sit on a Balance Bike with good balance, with both feet on the ground and begin to be able to glide on the bike.

 

·        I have repeated experiences at the woodwork bench. I think about what I am creating and how I want it to look e.g. “I’m making a car, it has four wheels.” I am introduced to more tools and how to use these safely.

·        I ride a Balance Bike, balancing with both feet off the ground, and maintaining control by steering and being able to slow down or speed up.

·       I can start to explore a bike with pedals and begin to put one foot on a pedal.

·        I decide on the model I will make. I choose the materials they want to use, shape materials with tools, and join materials together.

·       I can begin to glide and put my feet on the pedals, sometimes turning the pedals to move forwards.

Characteristics of Effective Learning
Children will be engaged in: playing and exploring (children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’; active learning (children will concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter any difficulties, and enjoy achievements); creating and thinking critically (children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things)
2-3 Year Olds
Baseline

Around their second birthday, can I run well, kick a ball, and jump with both feet off the ground at the same time?

Can I use a spoon or fork to feed myself?

 

Skills

·        Gradually gain control of whole body through rolling and kicking balls, climbing and balancing.

·        Starts to explore large cars and pushes with feet.

·        Build independently with a range of appropriate resources.

·        Explore different materials and tools, pouring, emptying, scooping, squashing, bending, twisting.

·        To begin to be aware of their body and start to participate in activities which cross the midline.

·        To be aware of their limbs and begin to use two hands at once.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Roll, kick, leg, hand (naming the body part they use for the action they are doing)

·        Climb, balance, up, down

·        Push, move, car, forwards, backwards.

·        Pour, empty, scoop, squash, bend, twist

 

Enabling Environments

See Common Play Behaviours documents

Real tools

Nuts and bolts pushing into dough beginning to manipulate objects.

Bikes

Large cars, things they can push along with their feet.

Climbing trees

Begin to explore with adult support. Support them climbing up the ladder to the slide and using the slide with adult support.

Jumping

Developing whole body co-ordination jumping with two feet off the floor.

Water

Provide cups, jugs and bowls for pouring and emptying, dropping objects into the water and observing the way the water moves.

Sand

Exploring and moving sand using spade, scoops, hands.

Malleable

Playdough using hands to flatten, squash, bend, twist and stretch dough.

Crossing the Midline

Play Row row your boat with an oar on each side, flipper flappers and magic wands, pretend to wash yourself with a face cloth all over.

Bilateral co-ordination

Painting with two hands, chalking with two hands, playing the drums.

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I start to move balls in different ways ie throwing?

·        Can I start to explore building using different materials?

·        Can I start to climb (ie stairs using the hand rail) and balance on different equipment?

·        Can I paint or chalk using two hands? (Shoulder pivots)

·        Can I begin to cross the midline?

 

Skills

·        Enjoy starting to kick, throw and catch balls.

·        Begin to sit on a push-along wheeled toy, use a scooter or ride a tricycle.

·        Begin to climb stairs and apparatus with some support developing whole body co-ordination.

·        Gradually gain control of their whole body through large movements such as walking and running.

·        Make connections between their movement and the marks they make.

·        Able to build independently with a range of appropriate resources (both large or small scale structures with loose parts)

·        To develop large movements by crossing the midline.

·        To develop hand and eye co-ordination using two hands at the same time.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Throw, catch, arm, high

·        Push, balance, wobble.

·        Higher, climb, legs, arms, pull

·        Walk, run, around,

·        Build, high, tall, small,

 

Enabling Environments

See Common Play Behaviours documents

Real tools

Using hammers and golf tees in playdough

Bikes

Three wheeled scooters, tricycles, push along toys and cars.

Climbing trees

Begin to climb small logs and stumps with adult support. Begin to use slide with independence  – eg they have a hand getting up the steps but then can get down the slide on their own.

Jumping

Jumping off small logs and tree stumps with adult support

Water

Filling containers until they overflow, transporting water by moving containers spilling and trying to catch water as they go.

Sand

Exploring and moving using spade, scoops, hands. Moulding making impressions using hands, fingers, knees, arms, filling containers and buckets.

Malleable

Tear or split up dough with fingers. Squash dough with hands and fingers to shape it.

Crossing the midline

Large movements with flags and streamers, large movements with fabric and paint, washing table down after shaving cream play.

Bilateral co-ordination

Use hammers and golf tees in playdough. Hold a block in one hand and steadying the other block when building towers.

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Do I start to put out hands to try to catch and throw a ball?

·        Can I start to use a balance bike, sitting on the saddle and moving a short way, uses a tricycle pushing my feet on the floor?

·        Can I climb more complex structures ie start to climb ladder, climb up tree?

·        Can I run around, change direction and slow down so I don’t bump into things?

·        Can I make lines and marks? (Shoulder but starting to use elbow pivots)

·        Can I build a tower?

Skills

·        Beginning to use equipment with purpose.

·        Go up steps and stairs, or climb apparatus, using alternate feet.

·        Kicks a stationary ball with either foot.

·        Throws a ball or a beanbag with increasing force.

·        Starts to catch large balls.

·        Continue to develop their movement, balancing and pedalling trikes, jumping and hopping and using two hands to manipulate real tools

·        Beginning to use mark making tools using elbow pivots and the digital pronate grip.

·        To develop independence in self-care using a potty or toilet, pulling up clothing and washing their hands with some support.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Introduce simple questions about what they are building using words ‘what’ ‘why’ ‘how’

·        Up, down, climb, foot, feet

·        Kick, throw, catch

·        Balance, pedal, jump, hop, fingers.

·        Potty, toilet, pants, wee, poo.

Enabling Environments

See Common Play Behaviours documents

Real tools

Holding hammer and nails with two hands –  under adult supervision.

Bikes

Balance bikes and pedalling trikes for them to begin to pedal.

Climbing trees

Use planks and climb rope ladder with adult support. Using the slide independently.

Jumping

Jumping and hopping from one space to another as a way of moving.

Water

exploring the way the water moves as they stir and mix.

Sand

Sifting hands through fingers and exploring the way sand moves through a sieve. Covers hands and fingers in sand.

Malleable

use rolling pin to roll playdough

Crossing the midline

bean bag toss and ball pass around a circle.

Bilateral co-ordination

Hammers and nails when using real tools with support. Jumping and hopping patterns.

End of Year

·        Around their third birthday, can I climb confidently, catch a large ball and pedal a tricycle?

·        Can I use a range of equipment purposefully?

·        Can I use the toilet with some support?

·        Can I use the digital pronate grip with mark making tools? (Elbow pivots)

3-4 Year Olds
Baseline

Around their third birthday, can I climb confidently, catch a large ball and pedal a tricycle?

Can I use a range of equipment purposefully?

Can I use the toilet with some support?

Skills

·        To know how and be able to move around safely and with some awareness of others

·        To experiment with a wide range of equipment learning some degree of control

·        To begin to work in a team or group

·        To lift crates or large play bricks to put into position with support and then independently with a good grip and standing upright.

·        Uses resources to build towers and vertical models

·        To roll a ball underarm with guidance.

·        Constructs in a large space with large blocks and in a small space with small blocks.

·        Has an idea about what they will build before they start and selects the resources they need as they go

·        Pours, transfers, transports, fills, scoops and moulds with increasing control sand and water containers.

·        Rolls, moulds, cuts and shapes malleable materials such as playdough.

·        Uses scissors with two hands to cut a piece of paper, begins to make snips in paper possibly with pronated grasp of scissors and palmer grasp of paper.

·        Explores fastening resources together using available resources

·        Uses glue to attempt to stick but may not be secure, sticks objects randomly onto paper/card.

·        Use large scale paper/sheets to make marks using shoulder, elbow and wrist pivots vertical marks up and down.

·        To begin to use wrist pivots when using mark making tools.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Safely, slow, fast, look

·        Team, help

·        Lift, move, carry, forwards, backwards, up, down

·        Build, up, high, low,

·        Roll, underarm, ball, fast, slow, look

·        Block, brick, design, build

·        Pour, move, transport, fill, scoop, mould, roll, cut, shape

·        Cut, snip, paper, hold, grip.

·        Stick, join, fix, stuck

·        Mark, draw, write, round, up, down, around.

 

Enabling Environments

See Common Play Behaviours documents

Real tools

Simple hammer, saw, nail and opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- simple cutting of pieces to begin.

Bikes

Two wheeled scooters and balance bikes. Resources to encourage role play with bikes eg traffic cones, road signs and ramps.

Climbing trees

With adult guidance using planks and crates and blocks around the tree to explore different ways to climb.

Jumping

Teach how to jump safely and adult guidance in appropriate ways to jump on and off equipment. Is it wobbly or secure? Is it too high? Look for others  and space before you jump. Bending knees when you land.

Water

Resources such as mops and brushes to develop gross muscle control. Water containers of varying sizes which they can pour, transfer, transport, fill. Drainpipes for transporting.

Sand

Sand containers of varying sizes which they can pour, transfer, transport, fill, scoop and mould.

Malleable

Rolling pins, moulds, cutters and shapes

Building

Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks.

Bilateral co-ordination

Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level. Masking tape, PVA glue, card, paper, tissue paper, crepe paper, boxes, tubes, lollipop sticks, match sticks, pom-poms, feathers, buttons. Range of drawing and mark making equipment including large scale such as giant chalks and sticks- modelling from adults. Range of painting opportunities large and small scale with differentiated paintbrushes. Sensory experiences linked to mark making- cornflour, IT, painting with hands and feet.

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Am I starting to take part in some group activities which I make up for myself, or in teams?

·        Can I choose the right resources to carry out my own plan. For example, choosing a spade to enlarge a small hole I dug with a trowel?

·        Can I collaborate with others to manage large items, such as moving a long plank safely, carrying large hollow blocks?

·        Can I use large-muscle movements to wave flags and streamers, paint and make marks?

·        Can I roll a ball underarm?

·        Can I use mark making tools with a wrist pivot?

Skills

·        Practises crawling forward on tummy or on all fours with more confidence

·        To use tummy, legs, and arms to pull self through a tunnel more effectively.

·        To climb the ladder steps and climbing tree independently with a firmer grip and alternate steady foot placement and more upper body strength

·        To be able to travel in a variety of ways using a wide range of body parts.

·        To make decisions about which physical skill to use for different tasks and activities.

·        To steer and pedal a trike with growing confidence.

·        To roll a ball using underarm at a target with good stance and shoulder position.

·        Stand appropriately and use hands and eye coordination to throw and catch with support.

·        To kick a large ball with more control

·        To know when they need to use the toilet without prompting and use the toilet independently, pulling up and down clothing and washing hands.

·        Develop control over scissors to cut materials holding with supinated grasp or wrist upwards, may still hold paper with palmer grip.

·        Fastens paper and card together with success, beginning to explore techniques to join thicker materials (eg boxes/tubes)

·        Able to use glue/tape to fasten thicker materials together, sticking carefully selected items together to achieve desired purpose.

·        To use resources to construct buildings and position resources both vertically and horizontally.

·        To connect buildings and structures (eg putting a road between buildings) and selecting the appropriately sized blocks/resources for chosen workspace

·        Understands safety elements (eg if tower is taller than themsleves it might fall and hurt)

·        To use rolling pins, hands,  cutters and tools to manipulate playdough

·        To recognise that dry sand falls freely through a sieve

·        To bury objects in sand using their hands

·        To stir and mix water slowly being careful not to spill with increased control

·        Mixing water and liquids with a goal in mind (eg can they make more bubbles?)

·        Begin to move rhythmically to music and explore dancing

·        To begin to use the digital pronate grip when using mark making tools.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Body parts; tummy, legs, arms, hands, fingers, thumbs, feet, knees.

·        Pull, move, forwards, backwards

·        Wriggle, crawl, walk, run, slide, jump, hop, bend, straight, reach, stretch, curl, low, high.

·        Steer, pedal, fast, slow, forwards, around.

·        Roll, under, over, through, up, down

·        Kick, aim, far, near, further, closer, furthest, closest.

·        Toilet, wee, poo, paper, wipe, wash, germs.

·        Cut, snip, paper, hands, grip, squeeze, thumb, fingers.

·        Fasten, join, stick, stuck.

·        Build, up , down, fit, make, design, choose, safe, secure, wobble, fall, too high, low,

·        Roll, squeeze, cut, shape

·        Dry, wet, fall, high, low, sift, move

·        Stir, mix, spill, spoon, bowl, change, bubbles, soap.

·        Move, dance, music, beat, rhythm, fast, slow, feet.

·        Write, draw, mark, fingers, grip, hold, turn, bend, squeeze.

Enabling Environments

See Common Play Behaviours documents

Real tools

simple hammer, saw, nail, screw, screwdriver opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- using real tools for a purpose- to build something specific

Bikes

Trkes and two wheeled bikes with pedals – lots of opportunities to practise pedalling skills. Role play resources such as cones, signs. Mark making tools and ramps.

Climbing trees

Obstacle course equipment – tunnels, frames, cones, ramps, logs and planks. Remind them of safe jumping off equipment and encourage independence in this.

Water

Resources for stirring and mixing. Bowls of varying sizes, spoons and whisks of varying sizes. Bubble mixture, food colouring, soap, sand. Containers for transporting  – smaller containers and measuring jugs, drainpipes and guttering.

Sand

Sieves – different sizes and containers to catch sand in. Objects and toys to bury – play buried treasure games and hide favourite toys in the sand with hands.

Malleable

Rolling pins, cutters, shapes, small clay tools and playdough tools to create prints and more detailed effects.

Building

Range of different model making equipment- with prompts ie cars to support. Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks- encouraging conversations about verbal planning and evaluating.

Bilateral co-ordination

Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level, cellotape, masking tape, large and small boxes, thick and thin card, paper, tissue paper, crepe paper, bottles, tubes, PVA glue, glue sticks, lollipop sticks, match sticks, pom-poms, feathers, sequins, beads, buttons. Range of painting opportunities large and small scale with differentiated paintbrushes.

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Can I match my developing physical skills to tasks and activities in the setting. For example, I decide whether to crawl, walk or run across a plank, depending on its length and width?

·        Can I continue to develop my movement, balancing, riding (scooters, trikes and bikes) and ball skills?

·        Can I go up steps and stairs, or climb up apparatus, using alternate feet?

·        I can use the toilet independently.

·        I can use toys and tools safely.

·        Can I use the digital pronate grip?

Skills

·        Uses scissors with supinated grasp with increased control to cut out a desired shape and cut thicker materials such as card.

·        To plan how to fasten things together and check that a fastening is secure.

·        Making decisions about what they will use to stick- which will be the most effective?

·        Controls brush or glue spatula to spread glue and make decisions about what the correct amount of tape/glue to use is.

·        Combine resources to create a structure and build more elaborate structures.

·        Change, adapt and modify models to serve a purpose and begin to create designs before they construct.

·        Choose the tools they want to use for a desired effect on playdough and to add detail to their creations.

·        To select the appropriate tools such as scoops, spades, containers and moulds to create intricate sand creations and manipulate sand into desired shapes.

·        To use scoops and spades to bury and cover up resources.

·        To pour a desired amount of water into a chosen container with increased accuracy.

·        Spill little or no water when transporting and beginning to be aware of not filling the container to the top to achieve this.

·        Planning and using the most effective way to transport water to avoid spillages.

·        Use of digital pronate or tripod grip when holding pencils and mark making tools and show a preference for a dominant hand.

·        Able to put on own coat and do up own zip.

·        To attempt to balance on one leg or try to hop or hold a pose.

·        To learn some simple sequences and patterns of movement to music and rhythm.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Snip, grip, grasp, hold, thumb, fingers, bend, wrist, twist

·        Fasten, fix, join, secure, move, stuck

·        Glue, tape, pins, nails, wood, hammer, saw.

·        Brush, glue stick, too much, more, less

·        Build, make, create, high, low, building, bricks

·        Change, design, fix, problem, solve, try again,

·        Tools, sticks, push, twist, cut, squeeze, flatten, roll, bend

·        Scoop, spade, bury, hide, hidden

·        Pour, measure, fill, empty, top, bottom, steady, still, slow, fast, move, carry, transport

·        Pencil, pen, grip, hold, fingers, thumb, bend

·        Arms, hands, zip, pull, over, through

·        Balance, leg, arms, hold, steady

·        Pattern, next, after, copy, repeat.

 

Enabling Environments

See Common Play Behaviours documents

Real tools

simple hammer, saw, nail and opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- cutting and joining techniques.

Bikes

Use of bikes in more elaborate role play and structures – creating roads, parking spaces, garages, pretending they are police bikes, motor bikes, enhancement to role play and continued practice of pedalling skills and balancing skills on two wheeled scooters and bikes.

Climbing trees

To encourage more elaborate play and structures – developing own obstacle courses this term- challenge children to make own course and plan together before they build. Planks, tyres, logs, ropes, tunnel, climbing tree, blankets, pegs, ramps.

Water

Smaller containers and measuring jugs for pouring with accuracy. Jugs with marks on to see if they can fill to the line. Buckets and guttering for transporting – challenge them to move water without spilling any.

Sand

Smaller scoops and spades- challenge them to use them to bury treasure and play hide and seek with objects in the sand.

Malleable

Variety of malleable materials and opportunities for the children to make their own (link to cooking experiences)

Building

Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks- encouraging use of planning and design in mark making (design sheets and use of chalk doors).

Bilateral co-ordination

Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level, hole punch, cellotape, masking tape, stapler, paper clips, treasury tags, glue/PVA glue, range of paper/card, lollipop sticks, match sticks, pom-poms, feathers, sequins, beads, buttons. Range of painting opportunities -differentiated paintbrushes.

 

End of Year

·        Can I use one-handed tools and equipment, for example, making snips in paper with scissors?

·        Do I use a comfortable grip with good control when holding pens and pencils?

·        Do I show a preference for a dominant hand?

·        Am I increasingly independent as I get dressed and undressed, for example, putting coats on and doing up zips

·        Am I increasingly be able to use and remember sequences and patterns of movements which are related to music and rhythm?

·        Can I skip, hop, stand on one leg and hold a pose for a game like musical statues?

 

Reception
Baseline

Can I use one-handed tools and equipment, for example, making snips in paper with scissors?

Do I use a comfortable grip with good control when holding pens and pencils?

Do I show a preference for a dominant hand?

Am I increasingly independent as I get dressed and undressed, for example, putting coats on and doing up zips

Am I increasingly be able to use and remember sequences and patterns of movements which are related to music and rhythm?

Can I skip, hop, stand on one leg and hold a pose for a game like musical statues?

 

Writing

Skills

·        See writing skills that link to physical development

·        To be able to further develop the skills needed to manage the school day successfully: Lining up and queuing, mealtimes, personal hygiene.

·        To be able to sit at a table with their feet flat on the ground.

·        To be able to use core muscle strength to achieve a good posture when sitting at a table or sitting on the floor.

·        To be able to move hands and fingers without moving the shoulders.

·        To be able to move and rotate lower arms and wrists independently.

·        To develop fine motor skills to use a range of tools competently, safely and confidently.

·        To be able to engage in fine motor activities.

·        To be able to use a knife and fork.

·        To continue to practise and revise the fundamental movement skills already acquired- rolling, crawling, walking, jumping, running, hopping, skipping, climbing.

·         

Autumn 1:

Real PE scheme of work:

·        Personal cog focus- Following instructions, practise safely, independent work.

·        Co-ordination skill- Footwork

·        Static Balance skill- One leg

Autumn 2:

Real PE scheme of work:

·        Social cog focus- Taking turns and sharing

·        Dynamic balance to Agility skill- Jumping and Landing

·        Static Balance skill- Seated balance

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Elkan Vocabulary (CL)

·        See writing vocabulary (Literacy)

·        Rolling, crawling, walking, jumping and landing, running, hopping, skipping, climbing

·        Balance, agility, co-ordination

·        Body parts to mention when balancing e.g. leg, one foot

·        Instructions, follow, safely, practise, independent

·        Cutlery – knife, fork, spoon

·        Thread, cut, control, formation

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        See Writing (literacy)

·        Weekly yoga sessions to develop balance and core

·        Weekly PE sessions (Real PE)

·        A range of fine motor activities- bead threading, spaghetti and cheerios, playdough, tweezers, pipettes.

·        Fine motor activities designated to particular children who may need extra support.

·        Playdough and plasticine available

·        Sewing table with plastic needles and wool

·        Mark making opportunities and tool exploration (see CPB)

·        Support with mark making, letter writing and formation

·        Mark making control activities- laminated patterns with whiteboard pens, tracing sheets, activities that require control of mark making resources e.g. paint/colouring within the lines.

·        Opportunities to practise using scissors (different types to offer support)

·        Adults to model and allow children to try to independently cut their food at dinner time.

·        Reminders to support children’s posture when sat at a table.

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I revise and refine the fundamental movement skills I have already acquired: – rolling – crawling – walking – jumping – running – hopping – skipping – climbing?

·        Am I progressing towards a more fluent style of moving, with developing control and grace?

·        Am I using my core muscle strength to achieve a good posture when sitting at a table or sitting on the floor?

·        Am I developing my small motor skills so that I can use a range of tools competently, safely and confidently? Suggested tools: pencils for drawing and writing, paintbrushes, scissors, knives, forks and spoons.

·        Am I further developing the skills I need to manage the school day successfully: – lining up and queuing – mealtimes

Skills

·        See writing skills that link to physical development

·        Further develop and refine a range of ball skills including throwing, catching, kicking, passing, batting, and aiming.

·        Develop confidence, competence, precision, and accuracy when engaging in activities that involve a ball.

·        To develop the overall body strength, co-ordination, balance and agility needed to engage successfully with future physical education sessions and other physical disciplines.

·        To begin to use a balance bike.

·        To begin to use a bike with stabilisers.

·        To be able to create obstacle courses that demand a range of movements to complete, such as crawling through a tunnel, climbing onto a chair, jumping into a hoop and running and lying on a cushion.

·        To be able to change direction and speed quickly

·        To be able to form letters correctly- using the RWI letter formation rhyme as support if needed.

·        To be confident to explore a range of different equipment and apparatus.

·        To continue to develop fine motor skills, handling of tools such as pencils, paintbrushes.

·        To continue to develop a tripod grip.

 

Spring 1:

Real PE scheme of work:

·        Cognitive cog focus- Understand and follow simple rules, name some things I am good at.

·        Dynamic balance – On a line

·        Static Balance skill- Stance

 

 

Spring 2:

Real PE scheme of work:

·        Creative Cog focus- Exploring and describing different movements

·        Co-ordination skill- Ball skills

·        Counterbalance skill- With a partner

 

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Elkan Vocabulary (CL)

·        See writing vocabulary (Literacy)

·        Rolling, crawling, walking, jumping and landing, running, hopping, skipping, climbing

·        Balance, agility, co-ordination, explore, stance, movement, direction

·        Ball, catch, throw, kick, pass, bat, aim, accuracy

·        Body parts to mention when balancing e.g. leg, one foot

·        Instructions, follow, understand, safely, practise, independent, team, rules

·        Thread, cut, control, formation, letters,

·        Bike, stabilisers, balance bike, steer, wheels

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        See writing (Literacy)

·        Weekly yoga sessions to develop balance, core, and mindfulness

·        Weekly PE sessions (Real PE)

·        A range of fine motor activities- bead threading, spaghetti and cheerios, playdough, tweezers, pipettes.

·        Fine motor activities designated to particular children who may need extra support.

·        Playdough and plasticine available

·        Sewing table with plastic needles and wool

·        Mark making opportunities and tool exploration (see CPB)

·        Support with mark making, letter writing and formation, letter formation mats

·        Bikes, balance bikes, bikes with stabilisers.

·        Balls- large, soft, small, hard, some made from familiar materials, balloons, tennis balls, ping pong balls, beach balls.

·        Adults to model using bats and allowing children to practise.

·        Encouragement and modelling of team games, introducing rules, targets and teams.

·        A range of obstacle course equipment.

·        Mark making control activities- laminated patterns with whiteboard pens, tracing sheets, activities that require control of mark making resources e.g. paint/colouring within the lines.

·        Opportunities to continue to practise using scissors (different types to offer support)

·        Opportunities to explore large open spaces- activities to encourage speed and directional change in addition to negotiating space safely.

·        Allow children to spend time observing more confident children without feeling pressured to join in.

·        Opportunities for low-pressure zones where less confident children can practise movement skills on their own, or with one or two others.

·        Opportunities for children to be highly active and get out of breath several times every day- Use of GoNoodle.

·        Opportunities for children to use a range of large and small apparatus both indoors and outdoors- tunnels, tyres, logs, planks, ladders, climbing walls, gym mats

·

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Do I develop the overall body strength, co-ordination, balance and agility needed to engage successfully with future physical education sessions and other physical disciplines including dance, gymnastics, sport and swimming?

·        Can I combine different movements with ease and fluency?

·        Can I confidently and safely use a range of large and small apparatus indoors and outside, alone and in a group?

·        Can I develop overall body-strength, balance, co-ordination and agility. Further develop and refine a range of ball skills including: throwing, catching, kicking, passing, batting, and aiming?

·        Can I develop confidence, competence, precision and accuracy when engaging in activities that involve a ball?

·        Can I develop the foundations of a handwriting style which is fast, accurate and efficient?

 

Skills

·        See writing skills that link to physical development

·        To be able to confidently negotiate space and obstacles.

·        To be aware of others around them.

·        To be able to demonstrate strength, balance and coordination

·        To continue to develop ball skills that were taught in the previous term.

·        To be able to engage in a range of movements such as running, jumping, dancing, hopping, skipping and climbing.

·        To be able to hold a pencil using a tripod grip.

·        To be able to handle writing equipment, demonstrating good control.

·        To be confident to use small tools, including scissors, paint brushes and cutlery.

·        To begin to show accuracy and care when drawing.

·        To be confident to use a balance bike.

·        To become more confident to use a bike with stabilisers

 

Summer 1:

Real PE scheme of work:

·        Physical cog focus- Performing a single skill or movement with some control, performing a range of skills and link two movements together.

·        Co-ordination skill- Sending and receiving

·        Agility skill- Reaction/Response

 

 

Summer 2:

Real PE scheme of work:

·        Health and Fitness Cog Focus- Aware of why exercise is important for good health

·        Agility skill- Ball chasing

·        Static Balance skill- Floor Work

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Elkan Vocabulary (CL)

·        See writing vocabulary (Literacy)

·        Rolling, crawling, walking, jumping and landing, running, hopping, skipping, climbing

·        Balance, agility, co-ordination, explore, stance, movement, direction, negotiate, space, perform

·        Ball, catch, throw, kick, pass, bat, aim, accuracy

·        Body parts to mention when balancing e.g. leg, one foot

·        Instructions, follow, understand, safely, practise, independent, team, rules

·        Thread, cut, control, formation, letters,

·        Bike, stabilisers, balance bike, steer, wheels

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        See writing (Literacy)

·        See EAD

·        Weekly yoga sessions to develop balance, core, and mindfulness

·        Weekly PE sessions (Real PE)

·        A range of fine motor activities- bead threading, spaghetti and cheerios, playdough, tweezers, pipettes.

·        Fine motor activities designated to particular children who may need extra support.

·        Playdough and plasticine available

·        Sewing table with plastic needles and wool

·        Mark making opportunities and tool exploration (see CPB)

·        Support with mark making, letter writing and formation, letter formation mats

·        Bikes, balance bikes, bikes with stabilisers.

·        Bike ability opportunity

·        Balls- large, soft, small, hard, some made from familiar materials, balloons, tennis balls, ping pong balls, beach balls.

·        Adults to model using bats and allowing children to practise.

·        Encouragement and modelling of team games, introducing rules, targets and teams.

·        A range of obstacle course equipment.

·        Mark making control activities- laminated patterns with whiteboard pens, tracing sheets, activities that require control of mark making resources e.g. paint/colouring within the lines.

·        Opportunities to continue to practise using scissors (different types to offer support)

·        Opportunities to explore large open spaces- activities to encourage speed and directional change in addition to negotiating space safely.

·        Allow children to spend time observing more confident children without feeling pressured to join in.

·        Opportunities for low-pressure zones where less confident children can practise movement skills on their own, or with one or two others.

·        Opportunities for children to be highly active and get out of breath several times every day- Use of GoNoodle.

·        Opportunities for children to use a range of large and small apparatus both indoors and outdoors- tunnels, tyres, logs, planks, ladders, climbing walls, gym mats

·        Movement cards for children to use and challenge others to complete the movement, posters with yoga moves for children to copy.

·        Access to I-pad apps that encourage movement (similar apps to swork it)

 

 

ELG

Gross Motor Skills

– Negotiate space and obstacles safely, with consideration for themselves and others;

– Demonstrate strength, balance and coordination when playing;

– Move energetically, such as running, jumping, dancing, hopping, skipping and climbing.

Fine Motor Skills

– Hold a pencil effectively in preparation for fluent writing – using the tripod grip in almost all cases;

– Use a range of small tools, including scissors, paint brushes and cutlery;

– Begin to show accuracy and care when drawing.

Literacy
It is crucial for children to develop a life-long love of reading. Reading consists of two dimensions: language comprehension and word reading. Language comprehension (necessary for both reading and writing) starts from birth. It only develops when adults talk with children about the world around them and the books (stories and non-fiction) they read with them, and enjoy rhymes, poems and songs together. Skilled word reading, taught later, involves both the speedy working out of the pronunciation of unfamiliar printed words (decoding) and the speedy recognition of familiar printed words. Writing involves transcription (spelling and handwriting) and composition (articulating ideas and structuring them in speech, before writing).

 

Characteristics of Effective Learning
Children will be engaged in: playing and exploring (children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’; active learning (children will concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter any difficulties, and enjoy achievements); creating and thinking critically (children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things)
3-4 Year Olds
Baseline

·        Do I enjoy songs and rhymes?

·        Do I join in with some words in songs and rhymes?

·        Do I draw freely?

·        Do I use simple marks including lines, curves and circular movements?

·        Do I enjoy sharing books with an adult?

Skills and Knowledge

The Language of Retelling

(Aut 1)

·        Have favourite books and seeks them out, to share with an adult, with another child, or to look at alone.

(Aut 2)

·        Pay attention and responds to the pictures or the words.

·        Fill in missing words from well-known rhymes.

Word Reading

(Aut 1)

·        Identifies environmental sounds and can copy/repeat some.

·        Join in with songs and rhymes, copying sounds, rhythms, tunes and tempo.

(Aut 2)

·        Identifies instrumental sounds and can copy/repeat some.

·        Say some of the words in songs and rhymes.

 

Writing

(Aut 1)

·        Preliterate Stage

·        Scribbles but might start at any point on the page.
Enjoys drawing freely.

(Aut 2)

·        Make marks on their picture to stand for their name (or something specific).

·        Add some marks to their drawings, which they give meaning to. For example: “That says mummy.”

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Elkan Vocabulary (CL)

·        Events and story telling-…happened first….At the end…happened.

·        Talk For Writing key vocabulary (linked to termly progressive texts) ie Once upon a time, the end.

·        Pre- RWI phonics key vocabulary.

·        Song and rhyme words.

·        Book, read, words, write, mark make.

·        Simple instrument names (see link to EAD)

·        Environmental sounds

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours.

·        Talk For Writing key texts linked to T4W progression- weekly focus sessions and focus shared reading of the stories.

·        Use of Key texts (see LT overview) including Pie Corbett’s reading spine books.

·        Book baskets in provision (see CL) include books from cultures represented in the setting including dual language books.

·        Use of QR codes to link to videos of adults retelling stories in different languages and in English.

·        Pre RWI phonics activities linked to pre-reading skills (environmental sounds and songs and rhymes, Fred Talk)

·        Nursery rhyme progression grid (see CL) and daily singing of key nursery rhymes

·        Daily opportunities to sing songs and rhymes and explore sounds, tunes, rhythm and tempo.

·        Wide range of mark making equipment in provision to support with mark making.

·        Focused support from adults in provision to engage and encourage sharing of books and mark making, imaginative storytelling.

·        Range of resources and activities linked to interest which encourage and inspire mark making and sharing books (ie books in dark tent with torches, large scale mark making in provision and on vertical surfaces such as chalk painted cupboard doors and the large art wall).

·        Range of instruments in provision to share and explore the sounds.

·        Weekly music sessions with visiting expert to explore and consolidate rhymes and exploring rhythm and responses using instruments.

·        Range of opportunities to give a purpose to writing and trying to mark make their name ie naming their work in provision,

·        Apples with names and photos on to begin to recognise themselves and link with their name. Peg labels.

·        Wide range of drawing opportunities through different surfaces, resources and materials- planned adult focus on mark making and modelling in provision.

·        Use of technology to share different environmental sounds from beyond the setting.

·        Opportunities to explore the local area, and school listening for sounds.

·        Planned opportunities for pre-phonics activities linked to needs of the cohort.

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Do I understand the five key concepts about print: – print has meaning – print can have different purposes – we read English text from left to right and from top to bottom – the names of the different parts of a book – page sequencing?

·        Do I make marks with a range of tools and equipment, sometimes giving meaning to the marks?

·        Am I joining in with songs and rhymes I know?

 

Skills and Knowledge

The Language of Retelling

(SP 1)

·        Understands the names of the different parts of a book, e.g., pictures, words cover.

·        Understands that print has meaning

(SP 2)

·        Understands that print can have different purposes

·        Notices some print, such as the first letter(s) of their name, door number or a logo.

 

Reading

(SP 1)

·        Identify signs and symbols in the environment and recall what they mean.

·        Explore different ways of making sounds with their bodies and repeat patterns.

·        Sing songs and say rhymes independently, for example, singing whilst playing.

 

(SP 2)

·        Hears initial sound phonemes

·        Recognise their first name.

·        Identify and suggest rhymes.

·        Use alliteration phrases in their play, e.g., sizzling sausages / chunky chips.

·        Copy alliteration tongue twisters such as ‘She sells seashells on the seashore’.

 

RWI Phonics

·        Begin to recognise the pictures linked to sounds in set 1 RWI.

·        Begin to be able to use Fred talk to blend words orally with adult support.

 

Writing

(SP 1)

·        Copies over circle and spirals with increasing accuracy.

 

·        Can use large threading equipment with support.

·        Scribbles but makes marks moving from left to right on the page.

·        Tells an adult about what they have drawn or painted.

 

(SP 2)

·    Copies over lines and diagonals with increasing accuracy.

 

·       Audio storytelling

·       Tell an adult simple facts about a story, e.g., a character or key event.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Elkan Vocabulary (CL)

·        Events and story telling-…happened first. Next…happened. Then…happened. At the end…happened.

·        Talk For Writing key vocabulary (linked to termly progressive texts) ie Once upon a time, the end, next, character.

·        RWI phonics picture cards.

·        Song and rhyme words.

·        Book, cover, read, picture, words

·        Repeat, patterns, name, rhyme

·        Fred Talk

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours.

·        Talk For Writing key texts linked to T4W progression- weekly focus sessions and focus shared reading of the stories.

·        Use of Key texts (see LT overview) including Pie Corbett’s reading spine books.

·        Book baskets in provision (see CL) include books from cultures represented in the setting including dual language books- ensure fiction and non-fiction linked to interest and theme.

·        Use of QR codes to link to videos of adults retelling stories in different languages and in English- link books nearby to support.

·        RWI phonics activities linked to pre-reading skills (alliteration, rhyme, initial phonemes.)

·        Nursery rhyme progression grid (see CL) and daily singing of key nursery rhymes

·        Daily opportunities to sing songs and rhymes and explore alliteration and rhymes)

·        Wide range of mark making equipment in provision to support with mark making- see Common Play Behaviours.

·        Focused support from adults in provision to engage and encourage sharing of books and mark making, imaginative storytelling.

·        Range of resources and activities linked to interest which encourage and inspire purposeful mark making and sharing books (ie books in different places, unusual books, writing in different places ie in role play, on OHP, linked to writing of interest, shop signs etc, writing in different languages, note pads etc to encourage purposeful mark making, and in role play).

·        Range of recordings in provision both written and oral (ie CD player) with tongue twisters and alliterative phrases- use sound buttons.

·        Weekly music sessions with visiting expert to explore tongue twisters, alliteration, rhyme.

·        Range of opportunities to give a purpose to writing and trying to mark make their name ie naming their work in provision, name writing in different media.

·        Apples with names on only to recognise their names.  Peg labels.

·        Wide range of drawing opportunities through different surfaces, resources and materials- planned adult focus on mark making and modelling in provision.

·        Use of technology to share rhymes and alliteration.

·        Planned opportunities for pre-phonics activities and RWI picture sounds linked to needs of cohort.

·        Large threading equipment, outdoor threading in provision and vertical threading.

·        Patterns to copy in provision/ pattern enhancements in planned provision- Pen disco

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Am I developing their phonological awareness, so that I can: – spot and suggest rhymes – count or clap syllables in a word – recognise words with the same initial sound, such as money and mother?

·        Do I engage in extended conversations about stories, learning new vocabulary?

·        Can I copy with increasing control?

·        Shows consideration when mark making. Do I start taking my time changing my tool as the marks progress?

 

Skills and Knowledge

The language of Retelling

(Sp1)

·        Understand that we read English text from left to right and from top to bottom.

·        Is beginning to identify the main character and a key event in a story that they know well (with support).

 

(Sp2)

·        Make simple suggestions about what might happen next in a story.

·        Engage in extended conversation about stories, learning new vocabulary.

 

Reading

(Sp 1)

·        Hears middle sound phonemes

·        Recognise their full name.

·        Create or copy voice sounds, e.g.,. drip, drip, drop.

·        Count or clap syllables in a word.

(Sp 2)

·        Hears Phase 2 end sound phonemes

·        Reads 10 words (some might be of importance), e.g., I, see, like, my, mum, dad, cat, dog, go to the, a

·        Orally segment and blend words.

·        Recognise words with the same initial sound, such as mum, mouse and money.

 

RWI Phonics

·        To be able to recognise and say sounds from set 1 RWI sounds.

·        Be able to orally segment and blend words.

·        Be able to use fred talk to confidently blend words.

 

Writing

(Sp1)

·        Copies over wobbly (jellies) and zig-zag lines.

 

·        Emergent Stage

·        Writes some of their name correctly.

·        Writes some letters correctly

·        Say an appropriate word to complete a sentence that is said aloud, e.g., We’re going to the … zoo/park/ shop/beach.

 

(SP 2)

·        Copies over loopies and wave lines.

·

·        Five finger grasps used.

·        Writes all of their name correctly.

·        Use some of their print and letter knowledge in their early writing. For example: writing a pretend shopping list that starts at the top of the page; write ‘m’ for mummy.

·        Say a clause to complete a sentence that is said aloud, e.g., When we went to the beach today … I played in the sand

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Elkan Vocabulary (CL)

·        Events and story telling-…happened first. Next…happened. Then…happened, last happened, then happened.. At the end…happened, at the beginning happened, in the middle happened, in the end happened.

·        Talk For Writing key vocabulary (linked to termly progressive texts)

·        RWI phonics set 1 sounds.

·        Song and rhyme words.

·        Book, character, event, next

·        Name, letters

·        Fred Talk

·        I, see, like, my, mum, dad, cat, dog, go to the, a

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours.

·        Talk For Writing key texts linked to T4W progression- weekly focus sessions and focus shared reading of the stories.

·        Use of Key texts (see LT overview) including Pie Corbett’s reading spine books.

·        Book baskets in provision (see CL) include books from cultures represented in the setting including dual language books- ensure fiction and non-fiction linked to interest and theme.

·        Use of QR codes to link to videos of adults retelling stories in different languages and in English- link books nearby to support.

·        RWI phonics activities linked to pre-reading skills and phonics RWI set 1 sounds.

·        Opportunities to create or copy voice sounds, e.g.,. drip, drip, drop.

·        Nursery rhyme progression grid (see CL) and daily singing of key nursery rhymes

·        Daily opportunities to sing songs and rhymes and explore rhyme.

·        Wide range of mark making equipment in provision to support with mark making- see Common Play Behaviours.

·        Focused support from adults in provision to engage and encourage sharing of books and purposeful mark making with recognisable letters, imaginative storytelling.

·        Range of resources and activities linked to interest which encourage and inspire purposeful mark making (including recognisable letters) and sharing books (ie books in unusual places (create book nooks to read in- small spaces), range of multi-cultural books, writing in different places ie in role play, on OHP, linked to writing of interest, writing in different languages, note pads etc to encourage purposeful mark making, and in role play- shopping lists etc).

·        Weekly music sessions with visiting expert to explore rhyme and using music to retell stories and use music to help describe.

·        Range of opportunities to give a purpose to writing and supporting the writing of their name ie naming their work in provision, name writing in different media and supported name writing in enhancements.

·        Apples with names on only to recognise their names.  Peg labels.

·        Wide range of drawing opportunities through different surfaces, resources and materials- planned adult focus on mark making and modelling in provision.

·        Use of technology to support reading/ dual language books/ websites and writing ie large whiteboard and link to Purple Mash website skills.

·        Planned opportunities for pre-phonics activities and RWI set 1 sounds linked to needs of cohort.

·        Patterns to copy in provision/ pattern enhancements in planned provision- Pen disco

End of Year

·        Do I use some of my print and letter knowledge in my early writing

·        For example: writing a pretend shopping list that starts at the top of the page; writing ‘m’ for mummy?

·        Do I recognise and write my name?

·        Can I talk about the characters in a story and story events in simple terms?

·        Can I start to make shapes that are recognisable as pre letter shapes?

 

 

Reception
Baseline

·        Do I use some of my print and letter knowledge in my early writing

·        For example: writing a pretend shopping list that starts at the top of the page; writing ‘m’ for mummy?

·        Do I write some or all of their name?

·        Do I write some letters accurately?

Skills and Knowledge

Comprehension:

(Aut 1)

·     Holds a book and turns the pages from the front to the back.

·     Understands what a letter is.

 

(Aut 2)

·     Understands what a word is.

·     Tells a story to a friend.

·     Will ask for help when they do not understand a word.

 

Word Reading

(Aut 1)

Phonics:

·     Read single-letter Set 1 sounds (RWI)

 

Phonological awareness:

·        Hears initial sound phonemes

·        Joins in with known songs.

 

(Aut 2)

Phonics:

·        Read all Set 1 sounds

·        Blend sounds into words orally.

 

Phonological awareness:

·     Joins in with rhymes and stories.

 

Tricky words:

·        Begin to recognise and read some HFW- I, the, my

 

 

Writing

(Aut 1)

·        Handwriting:

·        Draws their own large scale lines and circles (clockwise).

·        Uses tools for mark marking with increasing control.

·        Uses threading equipment with increasing control and confidence.

·     Five finger grasps used.

·     Name writing practise.

 

(Aut 2)

·        Ladder Letters ‘l, i, t, u, y, and j’ are correctly formed.

·     Has dominant hand for writing.

·     Uses pincers and tweezers with increasing control and confidence.

·     Can copy shapes, letters and numbers

·     Name writing practise

 

 

Spelling/phonics (words and captions):

(Aut 1)

·        Identify sounds in own name and other familiar words.

·        Beginning to write some individual letters (Phase 2) by saying the sounds for them

 

(Aut 2)

·        Beginning to write CVC words containing set 1 sounds with support.

 

Composition:

 

(Aut 1)

·        Can tell an adult about what they have drawn or painted.

·        Audio storytelling – Children use spoken language to retell stories (maybe supported by a sentence stem)

·     Emergent writing continued Children are beginning to mark make in the environment during continuous provision (some words may have the correct initial letter(s).

·     Create representations of people, objects and events.

 

(Aut 2)

·     Copies print in the environment, e.g. door

·     Begins to label pictures (sometimes with initial sounds / letters known)

·     Gives meaning to the marks as they write.

·     Is mark making during continuous provision with a purpose

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Neli Vocabulary (CL)

T4W-

·        Story language – Once upon a time, so, unfortunately.

·        Conjunctions- Who, and, but, so, until.

·        Effective verbs- shouted, chased, climbed, moaned.

·        Effective adjectives- e.g. a lean fox, a mean fox.

·        Specific story vocab- Gingerbread man, oven, lane, ‘farm animals’, cave; honey; stream; grass; swamp; climb; bee’s nest

Sequential vocabulary- first, after that, next, finally.

 

Book, pages, letters, words, characters, events, predictable and repetitive phrases

RWI- Sounds, letters, Fred talk, letter formation rhymes

 

 

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviour documents

·        Language rich environment with staff engaging in back-and-forth interactions with children throughout all parts of the day. Staff will model and encourage continued and developed conversations, e.g. open-ended questions.

·        Staff read frequently to children and engage them actively in stories, and rhymes, and then provide them with extensive opportunities to use and embed new words in a range of contexts.

·        T4W key texts, story map, hook for learning photographs or work for children to reflect upon.

·        Book baskets in provision (see CL) include books from cultures represented in the setting including dual language books.

·        Use of key texts (see LT overview) including Pie Corbett’s reading spine books.

·        RWI Set 1 sounds chart

·        Nursery Rhyme Progression grid

·        Weekly Adult led writing/T4W sessions

·        Mark making opportunities (see CPB)

·        Wide range of mark making equipment in provision to support with mark making and letter writing/formation.

·        Focused support from adults in provision to engage and encourage sharing of books and mark making, imaginative storytelling.

·        Range of opportunities to give a purpose to writing and trying to write their name ie naming their work in provision

·        Name labels in a variety of areas – coat pegs, reward chart, writing area, feelings chart – to support recognising the letters in the name, the order and the formation.

·        A range of fine motor activities- bead threading, spaghetti and cheerios, playdough, tweezers, pipettes.

·        Mark making control activities- laminated patterns with whiteboard pens, tracing sheets, activities that require control of mark making resources e.g. paint/colouring within the lines.

·        MR MC Super power words – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTsdYvjsNxA&list=PLWee7c-xY-eRRDiyMBjhMqtTk8Qr1KJBY to introduce HFW.

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I read individual letters by saying the sounds for them?

 

Skills and Knowledge

Comprehension

(Spring 1)

·     Understands what a sentence is.

·     Talks about settings, characters and key events in books.

·        Re-read corrections when an adult points out where they have gone wrong.

·     Answers simple retrieval questions.

 

(Spring 2)

·     Talks about their favourite book.

·        Re-read books to build up their understanding and enjoyment.

·        Answer simple sequencing questions.

·     Recognise and join in with predictable or repetitive phrases.

·        Answers prediction questions based on what has happened so far.

 

Word Reading

(Spring 1)

Phonics:

·     Blend sounds to read words

·     Read short Ditty stories

 

Phonological awareness:

·     Begin to identify rhymes.

 

Tricky words:

·        Begin to recognise and read some HFW- to, go, no, you, of, said, be, are,

 

 

 

(Spring 2)

Phonics:

·        Read Red Storybooks (RWI)

 

Phonological awareness:

·     Identifies rhymes.

 

Tricky words:

·     Begin to recognise and read some HFW- your, here, he, she, we, me, was, they

 

Writing

(Spring 1)

·        Curly Caterpillar Letters ‘c, o, a, d, e, g, q, s, and f’ are correctly formed.

·     Majority of letters are recognisable.

·        Tripod grasp used.

 

(Spring 2)

·     One Armed Robot Letters ‘r, n’ m’ k’ b’ and p’ are correctly formed.

·        Sit with a straight back with my feet on the floor.

 

 

 

 

 

Spelling/phonics (words and captions):

(Spring1 and 2)

·        Write CVC words using phonics knowledge.

·        Beginning to write some HFW- e.g. I, the, go, she, he, my

 

Composition:

 

(Spring 1)

·     Orally rehearses a sentence with support before writing.

·     Writes simple sentences as a result of discussing ideas with the teacher (guided/shared writing)

·     Uses a finger space in between words.

 

(Spring 2)

·     Uses pictures (b/m/e) to plan a story.

·     Composes their own sentence(s) before writing.

·        Uses a full stop at the end of some sentences.

·     Says what they have written.

 

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Neli Vocabulary (CL)

T4W-

·        Typical story phrases (e.g. Once upon a time, One sunny day; Unfortunately; After that)

·        Conjunctions- and, because, but, so, who, until

·        Effective verbs- buzzed, chased.

·        Variety of simple and complex sentence types.

·        Repeated language e.g. the dogs were… the children were… “Oh no!” buzzed Mr Bumblebee, “I can’t stand this!”

 

Specific story vocab- beanstalk; giant; walked; climbed; market; gold; golden; harp

Sequential vocabulary- first, after that, next, finally.

 

Book, pages, letters, words, sentence, settings, characters, events, predictable and repetitive phrases, prediction, rhyme, finger spaces, full stops.

Book talk- I liked it because… I disliked it because…. My favourite character was…. Because….   My favourite part was….. because….

RWI- Sounds, letters, Fred talk, letter formation rhymes, Fred fingers

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviour documents

·        Language rich environment with staff engaging in back-and-forth interactions with children throughout all parts of the day. Staff will model and encourage continued and developed conversations, e.g. open-ended questions.

·        Staff read frequently to children and engage them actively in stories, and rhymes, and then provide them with extensive opportunities to use and embed new words in a range of contexts.

·        T4W key texts, story map, hook for learning photographs or work for children to reflect upon. (In addition to previous story maps for children to re- read and internalise. A floor book with T4W learning.

·        Book baskets in provision (see CL) include books from cultures represented in the setting including dual language books.

·        Use of key texts (see LT overview) including Pie Corbett’s reading spine books.

·        RWI Set 1 sounds chart

·        Display of HFW

·        Nursery Rhyme Progression grid

·        Weekly Adult led writing/T4W sessions

·        Mark making opportunities (see CPB)

·        Wide range of mark making equipment in provision to support with mark making and letter writing/formation.

·        Focused support from adults in provision to engage and encourage sharing of books and writing, imaginative storytelling. Adults will support and model writing lists, captions, signs

·        Range of opportunities to give a purpose to writing and adults to remind children to name their work.

·        Name labels in a variety of areas – coat pegs, reward chart, writing area, feelings chart – to support recognising the letters in the name, the order and the formation.

·        A range of fine motor activities- bead threading, spaghetti and cheerios, playdough, tweezers, pipettes.

·        Mark making control activities- laminated patterns with whiteboard pens, tracing sheets, activities that require control of mark making resources e.g. paint/colouring within the lines.

·        Resources to build CVC words – CVC lego, Pictures to encourage label writing.

·        Show off shelf in the construction and small world area.

·        Mark making resources to prompt writing in different areas- e.g. menus in the mud kitchen, experiment tables in the water area, clipboards and paper in each area.

·        MR MC Super power words – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTsdYvjsNxA&list=PLWee7c-xY-eRRDiyMBjhMqtTk8Qr1KJBY to introduce HFW.

·        Question of the day board- read the simple sentence and place name in either yes or no to answer. E.g. Do you have a cat?

 

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Can I blend sounds into words, so that I can read short words made up of known letter-sound correspondences?

·        Can I read some letter groups that each represent one sound and say sounds for them?

·        Can I read a few common exception words matched to the school’s phonic programme?

·        Can I read simple phrases and sentences made up of words with known letter–sound correspondences and, where necessary, a few exception words?

·        Do I re-read these books to build up my confidence in word reading, my fluency and my understanding and enjoyment?

·        Can I form lower-case and capital letters correctly? (Summer)

·        Do I spell words by identifying the sounds and then writing the sound with letter/s?

·        Can I write short sentences with words with known letter-sound correspondences using a capital letter and full stop?

·        Can I re-read what I have written to check that it makes sense?

 

Skills and Knowledge

Comprehension

(Summer 1)

·        Anticipate (where appropriate) key events in stories.

·        Demonstrate understanding of what has been read to them by retelling stories and narratives using their own words and recently introduced vocabulary.

·        Beginning to answer simple inference questions, e.g., can infer what a character by what they say and do.

·     Show an awareness of punctuation (full stops) and when reminded, pause when reading.

 

(Summer 2)

·        Use and understand recently introduced vocabulary during discussions about stories, non-fiction, rhymes and poems and during role play.

·        Answer simple vocabulary questions.

·        Beginning to check the text makes sense and self-correct when a mistake is made.

·        Beginning to link what they have read or heard to their own experiences.

 

Word Reading

(Summer 1)

Phonics:

·     Read Green Storybooks

·     Read some Set 2 sounds

 

Phonological awareness:

Suggests words to complete a rhyming string.

 

Tricky words:

·        Begin to recognise and read some HFW- all, were, her, have, is

 

 

(Summer 2)

Phonics:

·        Read Green or Purple Storybooks.

 

 

Writing

(Summer 1)

·     Zig Zag Letters ‘v, w, x, and z are correctly formed

·        Majority of letters sit correctly on the line.

·        Angles/tilts paper to one side to get the correct position.

·        Digits 0-9 are correctly formed.

·     Some capital letters are correctly formed

 

 

(Summer 2)

ELG: Write recognisable letters, most of which are correctly formed

 

 

Spelling/phonics (words and captions):

ELG: Spell words by identifying the sounfs in tehm and representing the sounds with a letter or letters.

ELG: Write simple words and phrases that can be read by others.

 

Composition:

 

(Summer 1)

·     Transitional  writing

·        Uses a capital letter at the beginning of some sentences.

·        Write sentences with HFW and decodable words that match the school’s phonic programme.

·     Reads back what they have written to check it makes sense.

 

(Summer 2)

ELG:

Write simple phrases and sentences that can be read by others.

Write short sentences with words with known letter-sound correspondences using a capital letter and full stop.

 

 

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Seek Neli Vocabulary (CL)

T4W-

·        Typical story phrases (e.g. Once upon a time, One sunny day; Unfortunately; After that; early next morning, suddenly, the following day)

·        Conjunctions- and, because, but, so, who, until

·        Positional language- in, through, down, up, under, over

·        Alliterative adjectives.

·        Effective verbs- buzzed, chased.

·        Variety of simple and complex sentence types.

·        ‘ed’ and ‘ing’ verbs

 

Sequential vocabulary- first, after that, next, finally.

 

Book, pages, letters, words, sentence, settings, characters, events, predictable and repetitive phrases, prediction, rhyme, finger spaces, full stops, capital letters, Non-fiction, fiction, rhymes, poems

 

Book talk- I liked it because… I disliked it because…. My favourite character was…. Because….   My favourite part was…. .Because…. I predict…. Because….

RWI- Sounds, letters, Fred talk, letter formation rhymes, Fred fingers, “Hold a sentence”

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviour documents

·        Language rich environment with staff engaging in back-and-forth interactions with children throughout all parts of the day. Staff will model and encourage continued and developed conversations, e.g. open-ended questions.

·        Staff read frequently to children and engage them actively in stories, and rhymes, and then provide them with extensive opportunities to use and embed new words in a range of contexts.

·        T4W key texts, story map, hook for learning photographs or work for children to reflect upon. (In addition to previous story maps for children to re- read and internalise. A floor book with T4W learning.

·        Book baskets in provision (see CL) include books from cultures represented in the setting including dual language books.

·        Use of key texts (see LT overview) including Pie Corbett’s reading spine books.

·        RWI Set 1 sounds chart/ Set 2 sounds chart

·        Display of HFW

·        Nursery Rhyme Progression grid

·        Weekly Adult led writing/T4W sessions

·        Mark making opportunities (see CPB)

·        Wide range of mark making equipment in provision to support with mark making and letter writing/formation.

·        Focused support from adults in provision to engage and encourage sharing of books and writing, imaginative storytelling. Adults will support and model writing lists, captions, signs

·        Range of opportunities to give a purpose to writing and adults to remind children to name their work.

·        Name labels in a variety of areas – coat pegs, reward chart, writing area, feelings chart – to support recognising the letters in the name, the order and the formation.

·        A range of fine motor activities- bead threading, spaghetti and cheerios, playdough, tweezers, pipettes.

·        Mark making control activities- laminated patterns with whiteboard pens, tracing sheets, activities that require control of mark making resources e.g. paint/colouring within the lines.

·        Resources to build CVC words – CVC lego, Pictures to encourage label writing.

·        Sentence building games.

·        Show off shelf in the construction and small world area- More information about their ‘make’ what does it do? How did you build it?

·        Mark making resources to prompt writing in different areas- e.g. menus in the mud kitchen, experiment tables in the water area, clipboards and paper in each area.

·        MR MC Super power words – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTsdYvjsNxA&list=PLWee7c-xY-eRRDiyMBjhMqtTk8Qr1KJBY to introduce HFW.

·       Question of the day board- read the simple sentence and place name in either yes or no to answer. E.g. Do you have a cat? Opportunities for children to write a question for others to answer.

 

Maths
Developing a strong grounding in number is essential so that all children develop the necessary building blocks to excel mathematically. Children should be able to count confidently, develop a deep understanding of the numbers to 10, the relationships between them and the patterns within those numbers. By providing frequent and varied opportunities to build and apply this understanding – such as using manipulatives, including small pebbles and tens frames for organising counting – children will develop a secure base of knowledge and vocabulary from which mastery of mathematics is built. In addition, it is important that the curriculum includes rich opportunities for children to develop their spatial reasoning skills across all areas of mathematics including shape, space and measures. It is important that children develop positive attitudes and interests in mathematics, look for patterns and relationships, spot connections, ‘have a go’, talk to adults and peers about what they notice and not be afraid to make mistakes.

 

Characteristics of Effective Learning
Children will be engaged in: playing and exploring (children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’; active learning (children will concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter any difficulties, and enjoy achievements); creating and thinking critically (children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things)
3-4 Year Olds
Baseline

·        Can I say when I have lots or more than someone else?

·        Can I complete a simple insert jigsaw?

·        Can I say some numerals?

·        Am I interested in sorting objects? (colour, type or size).

·        Can I describe an object by its size, shape or colour?

Skills and Knowledge

·        To recognise objects that are larger and smaller than each other.

·        To apply the attribute of long, tall, short etc to various examples (e.g. a bus is long; an adult is tall; grass is short).

·        To identify objects which are heavy and light.

·        To identify when a container is empty and full. Extend to half full.

·        To complete goal oriented puzzles and activities fitting shapes together.

·        To choose appropriate shapes when building for a purpose.

·        To begin to describe the shapes they have chosen with simple informal language (see key vocab below)

·        CLIC skills and knowledge

 

Key Vocabulary

·        notice, big, large, small, little

·        Long, tall, short, heavy, light, full, empty, half full.

·        Shape, fit, puzzle,

·        The ______ is smaller/larger than the____ (shorter heavier, lighter etc)

·        Heavy, heavier than, light, lighter than, balanced. The _________ is heavier than/lighter than the…

·        Full, half full, empty, most, least. The container is full/half full/empty. The ________ holds the most/least water.

Curvy, sloping, sticking out, roof shaped (etc), between, on top of, underneath, behind, in front of.

Enabling Environments

·        Provide experiences of size changes. Suggestions: “Can you make a puddle larger?”, “When you squeeze a sponge, does it stay small?”, “What happens when you stretch dough, or elastic?”

·        Talk with children about their everyday ways of comparing size, length, weight and capacity. Model more specific techniques, such as lining up ends of lengths and straightening ribbons, discussing accuracy: “Is it exactly…?”

·        Use real life examples of objects that are large and small in relation to each other. Begin with objects that are vastly larger/smaller than each other and move onto objects with a smaller difference in size. Include reasoning e.g. ‘do you think this large tree would fit into my small box?’

·        Adults should be continuously modelling language attributed to long, tall, short objects.

·        Initially begin with identifying objects the children think may be heavy – use lots of adult modelled language. Move on to comparing weights. One way to identify this is to identify that a heavier object creates a greater downwards pull. Ask children to hold a carrier bag; encourage them to notice if it feels as though their hand is being pulled down when something heavy is put in it. Place a carrier bag in each hand and identify which one is heavier by discussing which arm feels more pulled down.

·        Children should be given daily opportunity for sand and water play which can provide lots of opportunities to explore capacity.. Initially children should be exposed to the comparison of full, half full, empty using the same container.

·        Containers of different sizes in the water and sand areas – variety of materials and capacity.

·        Provide block play opportunities and have a variety of shapes and sizes for building large and small scale like blocks and interlocking bricks. Provide den-making materials. Allow children to play freely with these materials, outdoors and inside. When appropriate, talk about the shapes and how their properties suit the purpose.

·        Give children specific challenges, such as building a boat or a bridge.

·        Adults to model language as they play with shapes and to talk out loud to show their thinking as a model.

·        Provide shapes that combine to make other shapes, such as pattern blocks and interlocking shapes, for children to play freely with. When appropriate, discuss the different designs that children make.

·        Occasionally suggest challenges, so that children build increasingly more complex constructions.

·        Use tidy-up time to match blocks to silhouettes or fit things in containers, describing and naming shapes. Suggestion: “Where does this triangular one /cylinder /cuboid go?”

·

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Do I make comparisons between objects relating to size, length, weight and capacity?

·        Can I select shapes appropriately: flat surfaces for building, a triangular prism for a roof etc?

·        Can I combine shapes to make new ones – an arch, a bigger triangle etc?

 

Skills and Knowledge

·        To be aware of patterns in the environment.

·        To recognise and talk about ABAB patterns.

·        To notice mistakes in a simple ABAB pattern. (once confident at recognising patterns)

·        To order the events of their day using simple time related vocabulary. (see vocab below)

·        To order events of a familiar story using simple time related vocabulary. (see vocab below)

·        To say numbers in order to 5

·        To assign one number name to each object when counting.

·        CLIC skills and knowledge

Key Vocabulary

·        Pattern, continue, notice, next, mistake.

·        First, next, then, last

·        1, 2, 3, 4, 5

·        Count, how many, total, all together.

Morning, afternoon, evening, night-time, earlier, later, too late, too soon, in a minute.

Enabling Environments

·        Patterns on fabrics, paper, floor, walls. Opportunities to find and explore the patterns that they see. Adults to draw attention to patterns and model language around patterns.

·        Teach children to continue an AB pattern, adult verbalising the pattern encouraging children to continue it.

·        Make patterns with objects, sounds etc but make mistakes (verbalising to help children hear the mistakes at first) and ask children to correct mistakes – eg they shout out the correct object/sound. Use puppets to make mistakes and ask children to help the puppet.

·        Children should explore talking about and ordering the events of their day such as waking up, coming to school, dinner, bed time. Encourage the vocabulary of first, next, then and possibly last

·        Children can then move onto using the same vocabulary they learnt related to time when ordering the events of simple stories such as in talk for writing texts.

·        Engage children in following and inventing movement and music patterns, such as clap, clap, stamp.

·        Count down to forthcoming events on the calendar in terms of number of days or sleeps. Refer to the days of the week, and the day before or day after, ‘yesterday’ and ‘tomorrow’.

·        Encourage children to line up objects and touch each one as they count saying one number name for each object.

·        When counting pictures children should use the strategy of drawing a line through each picture as they count it.

·         Number and counting songs to be sung regularly each week.

·        Opportunities to count where possible, objects to count such as loose parts, bricks, small world toys and role play toys (eg five current buns in the home corner).

·        Counting games and activities that involve counting (skittles, jumping, counting goals)

·        Counting opportunities at tidy up time – resources that need to be counted eg rolling pins in the playdough area with a numbered shape to be put back on. This can lead to problem solving skills when one or two are missing and they need to count how many are left or how many are missing.

Counting at daily routine times (how many apples are left in the bowl at snack time or counting children as they line up at the door or counting the coats that have been left on the floor haha!)

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Can I extend and create ABAB patterns – stick, leaf, stick, leaf?

·        Do I notice and correct an error in a repeating pattern?

·        Can I begin to describe a sequence of events, real or fictional, using words such as ‘first’, ‘then.’?

·        Can I recite numbers in order to 5?

·        Can I say one number for each item in order: 1,2,3,4,5? (taken from end of year checkpoint)

·        

Skills and Knowledge

·        To subitise up to 3 objects

·        To recite numbers in order to 5 and beyond.

·        To select a given number from a larger group and count them out.

·        To understand that the number name assigned to the final object in a group is the total number of objects in that group.

·        To show numbers to 5 with fingers

·        To match numeral to quantity.

·        To begin to represent numerals using marks, pictures and fingers.

·        To understand real life problems – understand simple questions such as ‘have we got enough apples?’

·        To solve simple real life problems with numbers up to 5.

·        To understand the concepts of ‘more than’ ‘fewer than’.

·        To talk about an amount of objects using language ‘more than’ ‘fewer than’.

·        To follow, remember and construct routes.

·        To talk about the properties of 2D shapes using words such as ‘straight/flat/round/curved’.

·        To understand and use positional words.

·        To understand and use words to describe routes such as ‘in front of’ and ‘behind’

·        To talk about and identify the patterns around them. For example: stripes on clothes, designs on rugs and wallpaper. Use informal language like ‘pointy’, ‘spotty’, ‘blobs’, etc

·        CLIC skills and knowledge

 

Key Vocabulary

·        Count, how many, total, altogether, cardinal number

·        Number, numeral, subitise, represent, how many, count, cardinal, first/second/third etc

·        One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten.

·        The cardinal number is

·        Straight, flat, round, curved

·        In, on, up, down, across, in front of, behind, forwards, backwards, over, under, around, through

·        Compare, more, fewer, same, equal. There are more _________ than ________ / there are fewer _________ than

·        edge, curve, straight, round, flat, side, face, corner, smooth

·        circle, square, triangle, rectangle

·        Pointy, spotty, blobs, pattern, repeat, notice.

 

Enabling Environments

·        Weekly number focus with flashcards and objects to 3 so they learn to recognise the group (subitise). Games involving dice so children can begin to subitise to 3.

·        Point to small groups of two or three objects: “Look, there are two!”

·        Occasionally ask children how many there are in a small set of two or three. Regularly say the counting sequence, in a variety of playful contexts, inside and outdoors, forwards and backwards, sometimes going to high numbers. For example: hide and seek, rocket-launch countdowns.

·        Count things and then repeat the last number. For example: “1, 2, 3 – 3 cars”. Point out the number of things whenever possible; so, rather than just chairs’, ‘apples’ or ‘children’, say ‘two chairs’, ‘three apples’, ‘four children’.

·        Resources around the room displayed in groups up to 3 (eg three rolling pins, two large spoons in the malleable area so they have to put them back at tidy up time and recognise the number with adults modelling (eg how many spoons do we need on that shelf?)

·        Opportunities to count where possible, objects to count such as loose parts, bricks, small world toys and role play toys (eg ten fat sausages in the home corner)

·        Counting games and activities that involve further counting (skittles, jumping, counting goals)

·        Ask children to get you several things and emphasise the total number in your conversation with the child

·        Counting opportunities at tidy up time – resources that need to be counted with numerals to match to quantity eg rolling pins in the playdough area with numbered shapes to be put back on. This can lead to problem solving skills when one or two are missing and they need to count how many are left or how many are missing.

·        Counting at daily routine times (count the apple in the bowl at snack time – how many are there? Count the milks on the milk tray ‘how many all together? Count the children lining up at the door ‘how many children all together?)

·        Daily counting songs and rhymes using fingers to show numbers to 5 – 5 little ducks, 5 speckled frogs, 5 little men, 1, 2,3,4, 5 once I caught a fish alive.

·        Obstacle courses, treasure hunts,  small world play with town and railtrack layouts or storying involving relocation and journeys.

·        Mark making opportunities when playing games to keep scores or record numerals – adults to model using chalks, pens, counters, fingers.

·        Encourage children in their own ways of recording (for example) how many balls they managed to throw through the hoop. Provide numerals nearby for reference. Suggestions: wooden numerals in a basket or a number track on the fence.

·        Discuss mathematical ideas throughout the day, inside and outdoors. Suggestions: “I think Jasmin has got more crackers… support children to solve problems using fingers, objects and marks: “There are four of you, but there aren’t enough chairs…. draw children’s attention to differences and changes in amounts, such as those in stories like ‘The Enormous Turnip’.

·        Encourage children to play freely with blocks, shapes, shape puzzles and shape-sorters. Sensitively support and discuss questions like: “What is the same and what is different? Encourage children to talk informally about shape properties using words like ‘sharp corner’, ‘pointy’ or ‘curvy’. Talk about shapes as you play with them: “We need a piece with a straight edge.”

·        Books such as Grandpa’s Quilt, which involves rearranging a patchwork quilt to make a new shapes or Lucy in the City, which describes a lost racoon’s attempts to find her way home.

·        Activities that develop body awareness and own movement in a space building mental maps of their surroundings and developing concepts to identify positions and directions, like ‘between’ or ‘forwards and backwards’.

·        Discuss position in real contexts. Suggestions: how to shift the leaves off a path or sweep water away down the drain.

·        Use spatial words in play, including ‘in’, ‘on’, ‘under’, ‘up’, ‘down’, ‘besides’ and ‘between’. Suggestion: “Let’s put the troll under the bridge and the billy goat beside the stream.”

·        Take children out to shops or the park: recall the route and the order of things seen on the way.

·        Set up obstacle courses, interesting pathways and hiding places for children to play with freely. When appropriate, ask children to describe their route and give directions to each other.

·        Provide complex train tracks, with loops and bridges, or water-flowing challenges with guttering that direct the flow to a water tray, for children to play freely with.

·        Read stories about journeys, such as ‘Rosie’s Walk’.

 

End of Year

·        Do I develop fast recognition of up to 3 objects, without having to count them individually (‘subitising’)?

·        Can I recite numbers past 5?

·        Do I know that the last number reached when counting a small set of objects tells you how many there are in total (‘cardinal principle’)?

·        Can I show ‘finger numbers’ up to 5?

·        Can I link numerals and amounts: for example, showing the right number of objects to match the numeral, up to 5?

·        Can I experiment with my own symbols and marks as well as numerals?

·        Can I solve real world mathematical problems with numbers up to 5?

·        Can I compare quantities using language: ‘more than’, ‘fewer than’?

·        Can I talk about and explore 2D using informal and mathematical language: ‘sides’, ‘corners’; ‘straight’, ‘flat’, ‘round’?

·        Do I understand position through words alone?

·        Can I discuss routes and locations, using words like ‘in front of’ and ‘behind’?

·       Can I talk about and identify the patterns around me?

Reception
Baseline

·        Do I develop fast recognition of up to 3 objects, without having to count them individually (‘subitising’)?

·        Can I recite numbers past 5?

·        Can I say one number for each item in order: 1,2,3,4,5?

·        Do I know that the last number reached when counting a small set of objects tells you how many there are in total (‘cardinal principle’)?

·        Can I show ‘finger numbers’ up to 5?

·        Can I link numerals and amounts: for example, showing the right number of objects to match the numeral, up to 5?

·        Can I experiment with my own symbols and marks as well as numerals?

·        Can I solve real world mathematical problems with numbers up to 5?

·        Can I compare quantities using language: ‘more than’, ‘fewer than’?

·        Can I talk about and explore 2D using informal and mathematical language: ‘sides’, ‘corners’; ‘straight’, ‘flat’, ‘round’?

·        Do I understand position through words alone?

·        Can I discuss routes and locations, using words like ‘in front of’ and ‘behind’?

·        Can I talk about and identify the patterns around me?

Skills and Knowledge

White Rose Maths Scheme of Work:

·        To be able to match objects that are the same.

·        To be able to sort objects based on attributes such as colour, size or shape.

·        To be able to compare different amounts, saying when a set has more, fewer or the same.

·        To be able to compare objects according to size

·        To be able to copy, continue and create their own repeating patterns.

·        To be able to identify representations of 1,2 and 3. To subitise or count to find how many and make their own collections of 1,2 and 3 objects.

·        To be able to match the number names we say to numerals and quantities.

·        To be able to count up to three objects in different arrangements by touching each object as they count and recognise that the final number they say names the quantity of the set. Build on to counting 4 objects and then 5.

·        To use their own mark-making to represent 1,2 and 3 then 4 and then 5.

·        To understand that as we count, each number is one more than the number before.

·        To understand that as we count backwards, each number is one less than the number before.

·        To be able to explore the different compositions of 2 and 3.

·        To know that circles have one curved side and triangles have 3 straight sides.

·        To recognise triangles and circles in the environment.

·        To hear and begin to use positional language to describe how items are positioned in relation to other items.

·        To be able to count on and back to 4- count and subitise sets of up to 4 objects.

·        To be able to count on and back to 5- count, subitise and represent on a five frame.

·        To understand that when a five frame is full then there are five.

·        To make predictions for how many there will be if they add one more or take one away using a five frame.

·        To begin to recognise the link between counting forwards and the one more pattern and counting back and the one less pattern.

·        To recognise that squares and rectangles have 4 straight sides and 4 corners.

·        To use language to describe when events happen e.g. day, night, morning, afternoon, today, tomorrow.

CLIC:

Counting:

·        To recite the number names 1-10 out loud and in order

·        To be able to count up to three objects.

Learn its

·        To be able to recognise and remember that 1+1=2 and 2+2= 4

Key Vocabulary

·        Match, same

·        Sort, set, collection

·        Order, compare, more than, fewer than,

·        Size, big, little, large, small, tall, long, short, fill, full, empty, balance

·        Pattern, repeat, shapes, size, actions, sound

·        Subitise, count, how many? Numeral, quantity

·        Count forward, count back, before, after, one less, one more

·        Composition

·        Circle, triangle, square, rectangle, straight side, straight side, corners, length,

·        Positional language- next to, on top of, beside, in, on, behind, in front of, in between,

·        One, two, three, four, five

·        Five frame

·        Day, night, order, events, morning, afternoon, before, after, today , tomorrow.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        See White Rose Maths EYFS Scheme of work for enhancements to learning

·        A range of objects that can be used to count, match, sort and compare.

·        Five frames (empty and filled) to count, subitise, and compare.

·        Adults to model mathematical vocabularly regularly whilst engaging in the children’s play. E.g. please could I have one more carrot? Please can you find another red pen? I would like help to build a tower that is taller than my teddy etc.

·        Visual daily routine displayed in the classroom

·        Playdough and prompts/resources to shape the playdough into different sizes, lengths and shapes.

·        Numberblocks – NCETM resources to support.

·        Regular singing of number songs- five speckled frogs, five currant buns, 1 potato 2 potato, five little men in a flying saucer etc

·        Mystery bag- use for guess my shape, guess how many etc

·        Shape magnifying glasses.

·        Matchsticks available to make shapes. Can you build a circle with match sticks? Why not?

·        Adults to refer back to the visual timetable throughout the day, asking children questions relating to it. What are we doing now? What are we going to do next? What are we doing this afternoon?

·        Sing the days of the week song daily, discussing the sequence of the days.

·        Fiction and non-fiction books to introduce the idea of nocturnal animals.

·        Pictures to sequence

·        Dominoes and dotted cards to support subitising.

·        Different collections of amounts- e.g. two on a dice, numicon block of two, two cubes, two fingers.

·        Games to support counting, comparing and the composition of three. E.g. hoops and beanbags- throw the beanbags at the hoop. How many are inside the hoop? How many outside the hoop? How many altogether?

·        Daily CLIC sessions.

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I count objects, actions and sounds?

·        Can I Subitise?

·        Do I link the number symbol (numeral) with its cardinal number value?

·        Do I understand the ‘one more than/one less than’ relationship between consecutive numbers?

·        Can I compare length, weight and capacity?

Skills and Knowledge

White Rose Maths Scheme of Work:

·        To understand that the number name zero and the numeral 0 can be used to represent when there is ‘nothing there’ or ‘all gone’.

·        To continue to develop their understanding of comparing numbers and finding that one quantity can be more than, the same as or fewer than another quantity.

·        To be able to compare quantities in different contexts as they play.

·        To continue to develop their understanding that all numbers are made up of smaller numbers.

·        Are able to (through exploration) notice the different compositions of 4 and 5.

·        Continuing to develop their ability to subitise up to a quantity of 5

·        Beginning to understand that numbers can be made of two parts or more.

·        To be able to compare different items according to their weight.

·        To understand that it’s not always the bigger items that are the heaviest.

·        To build on their understanding of full and empty to show half full, nearly full and nearly empty.

·        To continue to apply the counting principles when counting to 6,7 and 8.

·        To be able to represent 6,7 and 8 in different ways and count out the required number of objects from a larger group.

·        To understand that a pair is two.

·        To be able to combine two groups to find how many altogether.

·        To be able to use language to describe length and height and make direct comparisons.

·        To continue to order and sequence important times in their day

·        Are beginning to recognise that regular events happen on the same day each week.

·        Are able to describe significant events in their lives and talk about events they are looking forward to.

·        To continue to apply the counting principles when counting to 9 and 10 (forwards and backwards).

·        To be able to represent 9 and 10 in different ways and arranging into smaller groups (to support conceptually subitising the larger numbers and explore composition)

·        To be able to recognise that when a ten frame is full that means there are 10.

·        To continue to make comparisons by lining items up with 1:1 correspondence to compare them directly or by comparing each set carefully and comparing their position in the counting order.

·        To understand that when making comparisons a set can have more items, fewer items or the same number of items as another set.

·        To begin to be able to order three or more quantities.

·        To begin to recognise number bonds to 10 using objects and tens frames.

·        To be introduced to 3d shapes, to explore the similarities and differences between them

·        To gain an understanding of 3d shapes and their features.

·        To build on prior learning of AB pattern work by exploring more complex patterns

·        To be able to say a pattern aloud to support identifying and continuing a complex pattern.

 

CLIC:

Counting

·        To recite the number names 1-10 out loud and in order

·        To be able to read numbers 1-10

·        To gain an understanding of numbers to 10- exploring more and less.

·        To be able to count on and back one.

·        To be able to count 10 objects

Learn its

·        To be able to recognise and remember that 3+3=6, 4+4=8 and 5+5=10

It’s nothing new

·        To be able to double 1 digit numbers

Calculations

·        To know when to add more

·        To know how to find the total.

·        To know when to take away

·        To know to take some away, then count how many are left

·        To be able to give out objects fairly

 

Key Vocabulary

·        Zero, nothing, all gone,

·        Heavy, light, balance, scales, heavier than, lighter than, heaviest, lightest

·        Full, empty, nearly full, half full, nearly empty, tall, thin, narrow, wide, shallow

·        Sequence, day, nowm, before, later, soon, after, then, next, event, yesterday, today, tomorrow

·        Length, height, tall, short, longer, shorter, taller, wider, narrower, measure

·        Combine, altogether, how many?

·        Pairs, march, odd one left, two

·        Represent, subitise,

·        Six, seven, eight, nine, ten

·        Count, forwards, backwards, counting on, counting back

·        Compare, quantity, more than, fewer than, the same as

·        Number bonds, ten frames, how many? How many more do I need?

·        3d shape names, roll, stack, 2d shape names, similarities, differences

·        Complex pattern, repeat, aloud,

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        See White Rose Maths EYFS Scheme of work for enhancements to learning

·        Using five frames when singing counting back songs- physically taking away the objects/ counters. Asking for the children to make predictions of many will be left each time. What will happen when the last one goes?

·        Regularly show examples of contrasting familiar numbers with 0 – e.g. a tree with three apples and a tree with zero apples.

·        Regularly asking the children to show an amount on their fingers – including zero

·        A range of objects that can be used to count, match, sort and compare.

·        Five frames and tens frames (empty and filled) to count, subitise, and compare.

·        Adults to model mathematical vocabularly regularly whilst engaging in the children’s play. E.g. please could I have one more carrot? Please can you find another red pen? I would like help to build a tower that is taller than my teddy etc.

·        Visual daily routine displayed in the classroom

·        Playdough and prompts/resources to shape the playdough into different sizes, lengths and shapes.

·        Different sized and shaped containers to fill and compare.

·        Numberblocks – NCETM resources to support.

·        Regular singing of number songs- five speckled frogs, five currant buns, 1 potato 2 potato, five little men in a flying saucer etc

·        Mystery bag- use for guess my shape, guess how many etc

·        Shape magnifying glasses.

·        Adults to refer back to the visual timetable throughout the day, asking children questions relating to it. What are we doing now? What are we going to do next? What are we doing this afternoon?

·        Sing the days of the week song daily, discussing the sequence of the days.

·        Daily CLIC sessions.

·        Dominoes and dotted cards to support subitising.

·        Pictures to sequence

·        Different collections of amounts- e.g. two on a dice, numicon block of two, two cubes, two fingers.

·        Games to support counting, comparing and the composition of number. E.g. hoops and beanbags- throw the beanbags at the hoop. How many are inside the hoop? How many outside the hoop? How many altogether?

·        Resources to support pattern building

IWB resources to support mathematical learning- Topmarks.co.uk

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Can I compose and decompose shapes so that I recognise a shape can have other shapes within it, just as numbers can?

·        Can I continue, copy and create repeating patterns?

·        Can I Subitise?

·        Can I count beyond ten?

·        Can I compare numbers?

·        Can I explore the composition of numbers to 10?

·        Do I automatically recall number bonds for numbers 0-5 and some to 10. Select, rotate and manipulate shapes to develop spatial reasoning skills?

Skills and Knowledge

·        To continue to practise and consolidate subitising, counting composition, sorting and matching, comparing and ordering

·        To be able to build and identify numbers to 20 using a range of resources.

·        To be able to recognise that larger numbers are composed of full tens and part of the next ten.

·        To be able to recognise that the numbers 1-9 repeat after every full ten.

·        To be able to count on and back beyond ten.

·        To be able to select and rotate shapes to fill a given space in a puzzle

·        To be able to explain why another shape would not fit

·        To be able to recognise that the quantity of a group can be changed by adding more.

·        To be able to use the first, then, now sequence to support adding – first- count how many, then- add an amount, now- how many altogether?

·        To be able to recognise that the quantity of a group can be changed by taking items away.

·        To be able to count all items, take away the required amount practically and then subitise or recount to see how many are left.

·        To understand that shapes can be combined and separated to make new shapes

·        To know that ‘double’ means ‘twice as many’.

·        To be able to use resources to double the amount. E.g. on a tens frame build pairs.

·        To be able to share objects out fairly

·        To begin to understand that some objects can be shared equally and others not. (Odd and even)

·        To follow positional instructions to place an item

·        To be able to use my skills and knowledge to solve mathematical problems

·        To be able to continue to copy, continue and create a wide range of repeating patterns and symmetrical constructions.

·        To be able to use maps and plans to support their play. E.g. use a map/plan to build an obstacle course

CLIC:

Counting:

·        To be able to recite numbers to 20

·        To be able to read numbers to 20

·        To be able to count 20 objects

·        To be able to count on and back 2,3,4 and 5

·        To be able to count in 10s

·        To gain an understanding of numbers to 10- exploring more and less.

Learn its

·        To be able to recognise and remember that 1+2= 3 and 2+3= 5

Its nothing new

·        To be able to double 1 digit numbers

·        To be able to swap objects (use ‘object’ transference) when exploring number facts.

Calculations:

·        To be able to add the right amount

·        To be able to add the right amount and count how many altogether

·        To be able to add numbers of objects to 10

·        To be able to take away the right amount

·        To be able to take away the right amount and count how many are left

·        To be able to set out groups of toys when playing

·        To be able to find the total amount of toys (from groups)

·        To be able to count how many objects each person was given

·        To be able to share an even number of objects between two people

·        To be able to halve an even number of objects

To be able to share 6,9,12 or 15 objects between 3 people

Key Vocabulary

·        Subitise, count, composition, sorting and matching, comparing and ordering

·        Identify, build

·        Numbers 1-20 and beyond, full ten,

·        Count on, count back, pattern, sequence,

·        Puzzle, fit, shapes, because…

·        First, then, now

·        How many? Altogether? Add, more, take away, recount

·        Doubling, pairs, sharing, half, grouping, even, odd, equal, equally

·        Positional language, maps, plans

·        Problem solving

·        Copy, continue, create, repeat, symmetrical

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        See White Rose Maths EYFS Scheme of work for enhancements to learning

·        Using five frames when singing counting back songs- physically taking away the objects/ counters. Asking for the children to make predictions of many will be left each time. What will happen when the last one goes?

·        Regularly asking the children to show an amount on their fingers – including zero

·        A range of objects that can be used to count, match, sort and compare, add and subtract

·        Five frames and tens frames (empty and filled) to count, subitise, and compare.

·        Adults to model mathematical vocabularly regularly whilst engaging in the children’s play. E.g. please could I have one more carrot? Please can you find another red pen? I would like help to build a tower that is taller than my teddy etc. Can you bring me half a cup of water?

·        Visual daily routine displayed in the classroom

·        Playdough and prompts/resources to shape the playdough into different sizes, lengths and shapes.

·        Different sized and shaped containers to fill and compare.

·        Numberblocks – NCETM resources to support.

·        Regular singing of number songs- five speckled frogs, five currant buns, 1 potato 2 potato, five little men in a flying saucer etc

·        Mystery bag- use for guess my shape, guess how many etc

·        Shape magnifying glasses.

·        Adults to refer back to the visual timetable throughout the day, asking children questions relating to it. What are we doing now? What are we going to do next? What are we doing this afternoon?

·        Sing the days of the week song daily, discussing the sequence of the days.

·        Daily CLIC sessions.

·        Dominoes and dotted cards to support subitising.

·        Pictures to sequence

·        Different collections of amounts- e.g. two on a dice, numicon block of two, two cubes, two fingers.

·        Games to support counting, comparing and the composition of number. E.g. hoops and beanbags- throw the beanbags at the hoop. How many are inside the hoop? How many outside the hoop? How many altogether?

·        Resources to support pattern building

·        IWB resources to support mathematical learning- Topmarks.co.uk

·        A variety of puzzles with different shaped pieces

·        Sentence stems to support reasoning. Adults to model reasoning.

·        First, now and then boards to support addition and subtraction

·        A variety of 2d shapes to join and separate. Vocabulary linked to shapes visible.

·        Doubling games- finding pairs, ladybird games

·        Opportunities to share out items within small and large groups in class. Discussions surrounding whether they have been shared equally.

·        Books to talk about sharing fairly

·        Games and activities involving giving children instructions that include positional language.

·        Adults to model positional language.

·        Problem solving opportunities

·        Maps and plans available for children to copy.

Resources to support the children creating their own plans and designs.

End of Year (ELG)

·        Number

–        Have a deep understanding of number to 10, including the composition of each number;

–        Subitise (recognise quantities without counting) up to 5;

–        Automatically recall (without reference to rhymes, counting or other aids) number bonds up to 5 (including subtraction facts) and some number bonds to 10, including double facts.

·        Numerical Patterns

–        Verbally count beyond 20, recognising the pattern of the counting system;

–        Compare quantities up to 10 in different contexts, recognising when one quantity is greater than, less than or the same as the other quantity;

·        Explore and represent patterns within numbers up to 10, including evens and odds, double facts and how quantities can be distributed equally.

 

Understanding The World
Understanding the world involves guiding children to make sense of their physical world and their community. The frequency and range of children’s personal experiences increases their knowledge and sense of the world around them – from visiting parks, libraries and museums to meeting important members of society such as police officers, nurses and firefighters. In addition, listening to a broad selection of stories, non-fiction, rhymes and poems will foster their understanding of our culturally, socially, technologically and ecologically diverse world. As well as building important knowledge, this extends their familiarity with words that support understanding across domains. Enriching and widening children’s vocabulary will support later reading comprehension.

 

Setting Specific Goals
Nature– recognising creatures and not being afraid, caring for creatures, observant, looking after plants and developing skills to grow plants and use and eat their produce.

 

First MilestoneSecond MilestoneThird MilestoneFinal Milestone
·        I can explore nature in my own environment ie touching leaves, finding where minibeasts live.

·       I am starting to notice plants around them and some of their features ie their colour or smell

·        I can find out what creatures around them eat and help to feed creatures ie the fish.

·       I can explore plants using their senses and start to be involved with their care for example watering them.

·        I am beginning to handle creatures (sometimes with help), observing things about them.

·       I am able to talk about what plants need to grow, help plant them and know which we can eat in our environment.

·        I can confidently handle creatures independently and am able to name commonly found creatures in my own environment.

·       I am able to confidently look after our plants, noticing when they need care ie water or the fruit needs picking in order to be able to eat what I grow.

Understanding of each-other– their place in the world, tolerance and acceptance of others conflict resolution, enjoying a range of celebrations.
First MilestoneSecond MilestoneThird MilestoneFinal Milestone
·        I can take part in celebrations.

·        I know my place in my family.

·        I can indicate similarities and special qualities in each other.

 

·        I can take part and talk about celebrations.

·        I know my place in my wider family.

·        I can help others and what it is to be kind.

·        I can recognise that everyone is different.

·        I can take part in celebrations and can share my thoughts and experiences.

·        I know my place in my community ie school/ culture and have an awareness of my culture.

·        I can celebrate differences in others.

·        I can share with others.

·        I can communicate worries and solve problems together.

·        I have a developing awareness of what makes a community ie different roles and responsibilities and can talk about their future place (ie what job I might like).

·        I can take part in conflict resolution and my own level.

·        I can celebrate and understand that people have different beliefs and cultures.

Characteristics of Effective Learning
Children will be engaged in: playing and exploring (children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’; active learning (children will concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter any difficulties, and enjoy achievements); creating and thinking critically (children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things)
3-4 Year Olds
Baseline

·        Can I begin to indicate my family to others?

·        Am I beginning to be interested in finding out how things work?

·        Can I explore and talk about natural things going on around me e.g. notice the weather?

Skills and Knowledge

·        Begin to communicate about themselves and their family.

·        Begin to notice the differences between themselves and others and show this through action or gesture.

·        Confidently explores natural materials using their senses and hands-on exploration.

·        Confidently communicate about what they see around them.

·        Begin to be aware of people who belong to religious groups through noticing and communicating what they see.

·        Begin to be aware of festivals and special times for themselves and others through taking part in activities and communicate some of their observations to others.

·        Begin to be curious about different occupations they see by asking questions (either verbally or using gestures) and offering comments.

·        Begin to notice signs of Autumn around them and share these with others.

·        Begin to explore the workings of things such as toys, equipment ie the OHP and other things that ‘work’ in setting by examining them and manipulating them.

·        Notice plants and animals in the environment and show some signs of care ie helping to feed the fish and the worms and watering the plants.

·        Begin to notice how materials change ie how ice or snow melts or how materials change when cooked, and indicate their observations to others.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Family, mum, dad (equivalent in own languages) me, myself, mine

·        Face, eyes, nose, hair, skin

·        Stick, wood, stone

·        Key areas in the environment

·        Vicar, church, Diwali, Christmas, festival, Mosque, Imam

·        Occupations- names linked to interest (Fire Fighter, Police man, Teacher etc)

·        Autumn, leaves, colours, falling, wind, trees

·        Twist, turn, push, pull

·        Fish, worms, food, feed, water ,tank, plants, flowers, water, grow

·        Melt, cook, change.

 

Enabling Environments

 

·        See Common Play Behaviours

·        Forest School experiences.

·        Photos and videos of their own families and staff in the setting.

·        Focused time to talk about memories- parents sharing memories via video or visits.

·        Begin to create ‘our family’ book with photos of our families and links to their families around the world. Include photos and info from when they go on holiday- use as a discussion and sharing book regularly with the children.

·        Diversity reflected in props, puppets, dolls and books- differentiated according to needs of cohort.

·        Books and other materials that reflect the community diversity.

·        Regular visits from a range of occupations linked to interest and the local community.

·        Range of natural materials throughout the setting which they can explore and stimulate senses.

·        Investigative resources ie magnifying glasses.

·        Trips planned to areas within the locality.

·        Regular opportunities to explore natural phenomena ie jumping in puddles, looking for worms differentiated according to seasons and need of the children.

·        Autumn 1 RE Myself- Examples of people who belong to religious communities (through visits and photos/ videos) – ways in which religion is an ordinary part of their lives (e.g. Christians visiting church to worship, Muslims participating in big community festival celebrations, Sikhs helping out in the langar [canteen] in the gurdwara, etc.)

·        Use visits and visitors where possible from religions in the community.

·        Range of  stories/picture books to explore some ways in which religion is important to some people (e.g. http://coloursofus.com/childrens-books-ramadan/; https://www.waterstones.com/page/christmas-christmas-books-for-children/448 – scroll down to “religious gifts”; http://www.readbrightly.com/picture-books-forhanukkah/); https://www.thoughtco.com/illustrated-childrens-books-about-sikhism2993531; https://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Books-ChildrensHinduism/zgbs/books/16244691)

·        Aut 2 RE – Explore the idea of special times: birthdays, key events in life, events of national significance, etc.

·        Explore Religious festivals, e.g. Christmas, Eid ul-Fitr, Hanukkah, Holi, Diwali, etc. – what happens during these festivals? How do they bring people together in a community?

·        Links with local care home and other cultural links to promote awareness if the world around them.

·        Range of mechanical equipment for children to play with and investigate ie pulleys, sets of cogs, wind up toys.

·        Opportunities to care for the environment- allotment area and watering cans/ equipment to care for environment.

·        Pets in setting- fish/ wormery/ container pond.

·        Simple cooking activities –using fire pit (marshmallows), salt dough to look at changes in materials.

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I begin to show interest in different occupations?

·        Can I start to explore how things work?

·        Can I use all my senses in hands-on exploration of natural materials?

·        Can I begin to show care for plants and animals in the environment.

·        Can I show my family members to others?

·        Am I interested in exploring how materials can change?

Skills and Knowledge

·        Can communicate more confidently about who is in their family and share some experiences about their own life so far.

·        Begin to talk about their family for example Mummy is at work, Daddy is at home.

·        Be able to talk about something that has happened in their life ie a trip they have been on, an experience they can remember.

·        Begins to show care towards my environment and living things I see through actions and comments ie waters the plants, gently handles snails, gives fish food.

·        Begin to be interested in the differences between themselves and others and show this through communicating their interest to others and pointing it out to others.

·        Begins to explore collections of materials with different and similar properties.

·        Begins to explore and demonstrate the Golden Rule through being kind and caring towards their peers.

·        Begin to communicate about special things from different religions through actions, words and gesture.

·        Notice and talk about equipment (ie dress or resources used) linked to occupations.

·        Begin to notice signs of Winter and Spring around them and share these with others.

·        Use a wider range of vocabulary to describe what they see, hear, feel and notice around them.

·        Spend extended times exploring a range of mechanical equipment ie pop up and wind-up toys, using different methods to make them work such as twisting, pressing buttons and manipulating levers and knobs.

·        Know how to plant seeds and what they need to grow and be able to talk about what they see when the plants begin to grow.

·        Know that animals (relate to pets and known animals) start as babies and one way they change as they grow.

·        Interested in ways of representing the world ie a globe, world map and shares this interest by asking questions and making comments.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Family, mum, dad, brother, sister (equivalent in own languages)

·        Baby, grow, young, old

·        Trip, visit, memory

·        Eyebrows, lips, ears, cheeks, arms, legs

·        Leaf, shell, wood, pebble, grass, soil, sand

·        Key areas in the environment

·        Golden Rule, treat, others, kind, caring

·        Occupations- names linked to interest (Fire Fighter, Police man, Teacher etc)

·        Winter- snow, cold, frost, wet, ice, freeze, Spring- buds, shoots, growth, seeds, new life, roots

·        Names of plants in the environment.

·        Lever, up down, pop up, wind, press, undo

·        Melt, cook, change.

·        Lion, tiger, giraffe, monkey, hippopotamus, crocodile.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours

·        Forest School experiences.

·        Photos and images of families from within setting and beyond, demonstrating a variety of family types linked to family types in our school and local community.

·        Books and other materials that reflect the community diversity and positive images of people who are disabled.

·        Continue to add to ‘our family’ book with photos of our families and links to their families around the world. Include photos and info from when they go on holiday- use as a discussion and sharing book regularly with the children.

·        Diversity reflected in props, puppets, dolls and books- differentiated according to needs of cohort.

·        Range of contrasting natural materials ie contrasting bark, rocks, pebbles and shells

·        Investigative resources ie magnifying glasses and magnifying containers.

·        Trips planned to areas within the wider locality

·        Regular opportunities to explore natural phenomena ie jumping in puddles, looking for worms differentiated according to seasons and need of the children.

·        Planting seeds and opportunities to care for plants with suitable range of resources.

·        Visits from animals to look at how to care for them.

·        RE SP 1- My Friends- exploring the The Golden Rule – treat others the way you want to be treated (e.g. Mark 12:30-31, Hadith 13, Leviticus 19:18, etc.)  Share stories of Examples of this from different religions, e.g. the Good Samaritan (Christianity), the Prophet Salih and the camel (Islam), Joseph and his brothers (Judaism).

·        RE SP 2- Special Things-  Use the sense to explore a range of artefacts from different religions; think about what they might be used for and how they might help people understand God/the world/each other a bit better.

·        Opportunities to look at changes linked to growth and decay- plants growing, wormery decomposing fruit etc.

·        Range of books and displays/ online links through Ipads to encourage investigations around growth, change and decay- differentiated according to need of cohort.

·        Links with local care home and other cultural links to promote awareness if the world around them.

·        Range of mechanical equipment for children to play with and investigate ie pulleys, sets of cogs, wind up toys.

·        Pets in setting- fish/ wormery/ container pond.

·        Further cooking activities – making simple cakes, using fire pit to combine two materials, look at changes in materials.

·        Materials to explore floating and sinking.

·        Visits from people from different occupation (linked to interest) and opportunities to explore this further through role play and outfits and equipment in role play/ setting to investigate through play.

·        Season display changed regularly.

·        Opportunities to explore the seasons in play- ie playing with snow, walks to explore the signs of Spring.

·        Key vocabulary displayed where appropriate and used by adults to support.

·        Globes, world maps and other resources which show the world- use videos/ google maps to encourage investigation.

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Do I begin to understand the need to respect and care for the natural environment and all living things?

·        Can I explore collections of materials with similar and/or different properties, sometimes talking about them and noticing how they might change?

·        Can I talk about what I see, using a wide vocabulary?

·        Can I communicate about my family and share an experience in my own life?

·        Can I continue to be interested in different occupations?

·        Can I explore, with more interest, how things work?

·        Can I observe what happens when seeds grow and animals grow?

·        Can I show care towards my environment and living things?

·        Can I show interest in the world?

·        Can I begin to develop positive attitudes about the differences between people?

 

Skills and Knowledge

·       Can explain who is in their family to others.

·       Begins to notice similarities with others ie both have 2 sisters and share this with others.

·       Can begin to talk about, or be interested in, memories their parents have shared with them linked to their family history.

·        Can begin to sometimes talk about some memories/ experiences in their own past.

·        Often talks about the differences between themselves and others.

·        Can talk about what they see in their environment around them.

·        Can talk about collections of materials and sometimes notice what is the same and different about them.

·        Can talk about changes to materials ie when chocolate melts- can describe in simple terms what is happening.

·        Can show some interest in places of worship through comments and questions and use of resources linked to it.

·        Can explore religion through our senses (can show interest in stimuli ie incense, music, story, food).

·        Can show an interest in artefacts from different religions through exploration, comments and questions.

·        Can talk about different occupations and start to talk about what their role is in the community (ie fire fighters help put out fires and keep us safe).

·        Begin to notice signs of Summer around them and share these with others.

·        Use a wider range of vocabulary to describe what they see, hear, feel and notice around them and begin to say why.

·        Able to point out different countries on a map (not naming them but knowing they are not England) and articulate some key differences ie temperature, sandy etc.

·        Can talk about forces in relation to what they feel when they break sticks, try to make magnets meet using describing words such as pull, push.

·        Can manipulate different more complex toys and real life mechanical objects to achieve a planned effect (turning a radio on, using the clamp to hold a piece of wood).

·        Can explain that a plant starts as a seed then has roots and a shoot and grows taller. Knows that the seeds from the flower make a new plant.

·        Can explain that an animal starts as a baby and grows bigger, has babies and dies.

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        See CL (Elklan)

·        Family, aunt, uncle, cousin, grandad, nanna (equivalent in own languages)

·        Hair, chin, fingers, toes, knees, elbows, wrists, ankles

·        Stem, branch, petal, root, bark, trunk, snail, worm, ant, beetle, soil

·        Key areas in the environment

·        Mosque, Church, Gurdwara, Mandir (linked to religions represented in community and setting), incense, Bible, Cross, altar, pew, font, prayer room, Mihrab, minaret, dome, Langar, prayer hall, Sach Khand, shrine, deity, inner sanctum.

·        Occupations- names linked to interest (Fire Fighter, Police man, Teacher etc)

·        Turn, clamp, wind, unwind, tight, loose

·        Seed, roots, shoot, taller, soil, food, sun, light, flower, plant.

·        Animal names-fish, octopus, whale, dolphin,  growth, baby, die/death

·        Pull, push

·        Summer- sun, heat, days, dry, hot, holidays

·        Names of plants in the environment and wider areas- seen on visits and trips.

·        Country, sea, map, world, hot, cold, sandy, dry, wet, green.

·        Melt, cook, change.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours

·        Forest School experiences.

·        Photos of families including different family units ie multi-generational, same sex families, large and small families.

·        Continue to add to ‘our family’ book with photos of our families and links to their families around the world. Include photos and info from when they go on holiday- use as a discussion and sharing book regularly with the children.

·        Experiences display board or book with things the children have experienced in setting for the children to refer back to.

·        Encourage parents to share memories with staff to share with children either by video/ written or to visit to verbally share. Focused time to talk to children about memories- support with photos where possible.

·        Diversity reflected in props, puppets, dolls and books- differentiated according to needs of cohort.

·        Books and other materials that reflect the community diversity, positive images of people who are disabled, materials to challenge gender stereotypes.

·        Investigative resources ie magnifying glasses and magnifying containers and Ipads with magnifying apps.

·        Trips planned further afield to explore the wider area- contrasting localities ie the beach.

·        Regular opportunities to explore natural phenomena ie jumping in puddles, looking for worms differentiated according to seasons and need of the children.

·        RE Su 1- My senses-Explore different ways of using the senses using stimulus associated with religion, e.g. music, art, story, incense, food, etc.

·        Visitors from the local community linked to interest/occupation ie fire fighters.

RE Su 2- Special Places- Use the senses to explore different artefacts from different religions –Investigate how these artefacts are used by religious people in their places of worship.

·        Range of resources linked to the place of worship in provision.

·        Opportunities for further care for animals- eggs to chicks/ caterpillars to explore growth and change- photos and information with for children to explore further.

·        Range of books and displays/ online links through Ipads to encourage investigations around growth, change and decay- differentiated according to need of cohort.

·        Range of resources that support the exploration of forces ie elastic to stretch, twigs to snap, boats to push under water, magnets to explore attraction and repulsion including ways to record their findings ie sound buttons, mark making equipment.

·        Making bread and combining other ingredients ie melting chocolate

·        Materials to explore shadows.

·        Small group focus and adult initiated activities looking at the wider world- investigating countries that are very different ie deserts/ rainforests/ ice- photos, websites and other resources in provision to encourage further investigation and interest- Maps and globes, resources, pictures, videos.

·        Range and collections of materials to explore- some that have similarities between them and some very different- use collecting trays to encourage sorting.

·        Regular visits or video links to different occupations linked to interest- resources and outfits linked to role play and provision- linked books.

·        Seasonal display- Summer.

·        Provision and enhancements linked to Summer and opportunities to explore this further ie the ‘beach day’ in setting, looking at temperatures.

·        Differentiated vocabulary displayed in setting linked to picture or oral cue ie sound buttons.

·        More complex toys and real life mechanical equipment ie radios/ clamps/ tools/ old mechanical equipment such as broken irons etc to explore.

·        Simple life cycle materials such as Velcro life- cycles, videos and physical exploration of life cycles- focused adult sessions and resources as enhancements.

·        Visits from other animals or visits to other places with animals to develop a wider range of animal knowledge.

End of Year

·        Do I continue to develop positive attitudes about the differences between people?

·        Do I know that there are different countries in the world and talk about the differences I have experienced or seen in photos?

·        Can I explore and talk about different forces I can feel?

·        Can I begin to notice similarities between my family and others?

·        Can I confidently tell others who is in my family and can I share some memories about my life with others?

·        Can I use all my senses in hands-on exploration of natural materials?

·        Do I explore collections of materials and different materials, talking about what they see and the changes I notice?

·        Can I talk about what I see, using a wide vocabulary?

·        Do I show interest in different occupations?

·        Can I confidently explore how things work?

·        Can I understand the key features of the lifecycle of a plant and an animal?

·        Can I begin to understand the need to respect and care for the natural environment and all living things?

 

Reception
Baseline

·         Do I continue to develop positive attitudes about the differences between people?

·         Do I know that there are different countries in the world and talk about the differences I have experienced or seen in photos?

·         Can I explore and talk about different forces I can feel?

·         Can I begin to notice similarities between my family and others?

·         Can I confidently tell others who is in my family and can I share some memories about my life with others?

·         Can I use all my senses in hands-on exploration of natural materials?

·         Do I explore collections of materials and different materials, talking about what they see and the changes I notice?

·         Can I talk about what I see, using a wide vocabulary?

·         Do I show interest in different occupations?

·         Can I confidently explore how things work?

·         Can I understand the key features of the lifecycle of a plant and an animal?

·        ·         Can I begin to understand the need to respect and care for the natural environment and all living things?

Skills and Knowledge

·        Understand the effect of changing seasons on the natural world around them.

·        Describe what they see, hear, and feel whilst outside.

·        To be confident to talk to others about their family, naming members and their relationships.

·        To be able to engage in discussion about families, asking and answering questions about their own and other families.

·        To be able to identify the similarities and differences between different families within the class. This could be through discussion, use of photographs and stories the children have been told.

·        To understand that different countries may be similar or different in regards to the day to day lifestyles.

·        To be able to recognise and identify any changes in the environment when the seasons are changing. E.g. The leaves are falling from the trees. It is getting colder and we may see frost, the flowers are no longer blooming, puddles in the rain.

·        To be able to use their senses to support any comments about the environment and refer to them, e.g. I can see a ladybird flying, I can hear a bee, I can feel the ice melting in my hand.

·        To be able to build up my confidence to explore unfamiliar environments. To make comments and observations about the world around them.

·        To begin to identify some of the people they may come across within their local community, e.g. teachers, doctors, nurses, fire services, hairdresser, delivery and shop staff.

 

Autumn 1:

RE: LAS Unit: Myself

·        To be able to identify different religions in the world.

·        To be able to engage in discussion about different religions- Can the children talk about their own religion and compare with others?

·        To be able to compare different festivals that take place for different religions- e.g Diwali and Christmas.

·        To be able to talk about different places of worship and why they are special.

 

Autumn 2:

RE: LAS Unit: Special People to me

·        To be able to identify why they are special.

·        To be able to identify what makes others special.

To be able to identify people who are important to members of a religious group- e.g. Jesus, Rama and Sita, Muhammad.

Key Vocabulary

·        Different occupations e.g. fire fighter, teacher, postal worker, police officer, mechanic…

·        Past, present

·        Environment

·        Calendar, yesterday, year, month, week, day, weather

·        Family, brother, sister, mum, dad, aunty, uncle, grandmother, grandfather etc

·        Religion, beliefs, faith, celebrations,

·        Different religions- Islam, Muslim, Christianity, Christian, Hinduism, Hindu

·        Religious festivals

– Diwali, diva lamps, Rama, Sita, light, Ravana, Mendhi patterns, fireworks, rangoli

– Christmas, Nativity, Mary, Joseph, Jesus, God, Angels, shepherds, wise men, donkey, Christingle

·        Special

·        Seasons- Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

·        Autumnal vocab- leaves, cold, rain, drizzle, sunshine, conkers, squirrels, cobwebs, breeze, red, yellow, green, brown, wind, trees, harvest, rake, scarecrow, pumpkin, tractor, corn, pine cones, combine harvester, hedgehog.

·        Similarity, difference, diversity

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Visits to places of worship, visitors from people with different religions to visit- e.g. Hinduism workshop (Diwali), Church visit (Harvest festival/Christingle).

·        Opportunities to discuss own religions and make comparisons.

·        Celebrations of festivals- Harvest festival, Diwali, Christmas.

·        Family photographs for children to see and discuss with others about what is special about us and our families. Opportunities for the children to look at the photographs and discuss similarities and differences between them.

·        Stories linked to different families.

·        Books with different religious stories for children to explore and adults to support with.

·        Opportunities for children to explore the outdoors in all types of weather. Adults to prompt discussion around the weather and how the outdoor area is changing/adapting.

·        Provide opportunities for children to note and record the weather.

·        A weather chart for the morning with children being able to change it throughout the day as and when needed.

·        Seasonal books about Autumn. References to weather, animals, plants etc.

·        Sentence stems and prompts from adults to promote discussion using the senses.

·        World Hello Day

·        Christmas around the world.

·        Activities to promote exploration. Key tasks/questions- How might I break the ice? What happens when we mix vinegar and baking soda?

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I talk about members of my immediate family and community?

·        Can I name and begin to describe people who are familiar to me?

·        Do I understand that some places are special to members of my community?

·        Can I make observations of the effect of changing seasons have on the natural worlds around them?

·        Am I aware that lifestyle may be different in other countries?

·        Do I recognise that people have different beliefs and celebrate special times in different ways?

·        Do I recognise some environments that are different from the one in which I live?

·        Am I beginning to describe what I see, hear and feel while outside?

·        Am I exploring the world around me?

 

Skills and Knowledge

 

·        To be able to recognise and tell others that our school is in Lincoln.

·        To be able to talk about the features of the school and its surroundings.

·        To be able to draw simple maps of their immediate environment, or maps from imaginary story settings they are familiar with.

·        To be able to use vocabulary linked to the immediate environment.

·        To be able to talk about different occupations that the children are familiar with and what their roles are within the community.

·        To be able to talk about how events may have changed from the past to the present.

·        To be able to recognise that things happened before they were born.

·        To be able to offer comments regarding photographs or artefacts that show how things may have changed throughout time. E.g. houses, toys, transport.

·        To be able to talk about fictional and non-fictional characters from a range of cultures and times.

·        To be able to draw out key themes from stories and talk about them in regard to the children’s own experiences. E.g. bravery, kindness.

·        To retell stories and rhymes that include characters from the past.

·        Do I compare different seasons and talk about the changes in the environment.

·        To be able to compare the different seasons with countries that may differ.

·        To be able to compare different countries and cultures from our setting.

·        To continue to use their senses to support any comments about the environment and refer to them, e.g. I can see a ladybird flying, I can hear a bee, I can feel the ice melting in my hand.

·        To continue to build up my confidence to explore unfamiliar environments. To make comments and observations about the world around them.

·        To explore plants and animals in the environment. To make comments and notes/drawings of what they see.

 

Spring 1:

RE: LAS Unit: Our Special Books

·        To be able to listen to and engage in discussion about different religious stories they have heard.

·        To be able to identify why they think the story is special to different religious groups.

·        To be able to talk about how religious people treat their books to show that they respect them.

 

Spring 2:

RE: UC Unit: Salvation – Why do Christians put a cross in an Easter garden?

·        To be able to listen to and retell ‘The Easter Story’

·        To be able to engage in discussion about the events that take place in ‘The Easter Story’.

·        To be able to describe how Christians celebrate Easter.

·        To be able to identify what each of the parts identify in an Easter garden.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        Different occupations e.g. fire fighter, teacher, postal worker, police officer, mechanic…

·        School, city, town, house, bungalow, shops, road, path, map

·        Past, present, toys, transport, events, artefacts

·        Environment, place, change

·        Countries, weather, hot, cold, animals, plants

·        Fiction, non-fiction

·        Calendar, yesterday, year, month, week, day

·        Family, brother, sister, mum, dad, aunty, uncle, grandmother, grandfather etc

·        Religion, beliefs, faith, celebrations,

·        Different religions- Islam, Muslim, Christianity, Christian, Hinduism, Hindu

·        Religious festivals

– Easter- holy, cross, Good Friday, Jesus, hot cross bun, life, baby animals.

·        Special

·        Seasons- Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

·        Spring vocabulary- buds, sunshine, rain, butterfly, chicks (hatch), lambs, tadpoles, frogspawn, grow, flowers, blossom, animals, plants

·        Similarity, difference, diversity

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions.

·        Local city maps

·        Photographs of different types of houses, toys, transport from the present and past.

·        Labels around the school- e.g. door, window, hallway etc.

·        I spy with my little eye games to encourage children to explore their environment.

·        Books with a focus on different occupation.

·        Books with fictional and non-fictional characters from a range of cultures and times.

·        Books with themes such as bravery, kindness, responsibility.

·        Visits from members of the community with different occupations.

·        Videos and stories that detail events from the past. Adults to support children to make links with the present.

·        Photographs of previous events and artefacts to prompt talking time- discussions about what could be happening, why it might be happening etc.

·        Visit to the care home to listen to the elderly tell stories. We can share our stories and lives and compare them.

·        Opportunities for children to explore the outdoors in all types of weather. Adults to prompt discussion around the weather and how the outdoor area is changing/adapting.

·        Provide opportunities for children to note and record the weather.

·        A weather chart for the morning with children being able to change it throughout the day as and when needed.

·        Opportunities for children to compare Autumn, Winter, Spring seasons. A variety of photographs taken in all seasons of the children to help prompt discussion.

·        Opportunities to explore seasons in different countries- e.g. Africa, Australia, Antartica.

·        Language weeks – to explore different countries and cultures.

·        Clipboards, notebooks etc to record any observations in the environment.

·        Opportunities to visit places of worship and talk about the special books.

·        Easter service in church

·        Exploration of Easter through story telling.

Opportunities to read stories and bring in our special stories from home. Why are they special to us?

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Can I draw information from a simple map?

·        Can I explore the natural world around me?

·        Do I describe what I see, hear and feel whilst outside?

·        Can I recognise some environments that are different to the one in which I live?

·        Do I continue to develop my understanding of the effect the changing seasons have on the natural world around me?

·        Do I compare and contrast characters from stories, including figures from the past?

·        Can I comment on images of familiar situations in the past?

·        Have I developed my knowledge and understanding of people within my community? Am I aware of the different occupations and their role in the community?

Do I recognise some similarities and differences between life in this country and life in other countries?

Skills and Knowledge

 

·        To be able to confidently talk about the people around them and their roles in society- The children will be able to talk about different occupations and the importance of each of them within our community.

·        To be able to identify whether a resource is from the past or present, discussing the similarities and differences between times. The children will flash back to the previous term and use this information to support their comments and ideas.

·        To be able to make comments on whether they believe a story or character was set in the present or past and give reasons to support.

·        To be able to draw upon previous experiences when comparing different religions and cultures.

·        To be able to identify non-fiction books to support with our understanding of our environment. Understanding that we can use these books to learn how to carry out tasks such as planting a seed.

·        To be able to understand more differences between lifestyles in different countries and some countries may be similar in some aspects but different in others.

·        To be able to recognise a map and explore maps from different cities and countries.

·        To be able to make observational drawings of animals and plants in the environment. Offering comments about the different features.

·        To be able to identify some of the similarities and differences between our forest school and setting experiences.

·        To be able to talk about the changes that take place in a range of different experiments – e.g. cornflour and water, ice melting, colour changing flowers etc.

·        To be confident to talk about the season and weather changes and the effects they have on the environment.

 

Summer 1:

RE: Understanding Christianity Unit: Creation- Why is the word ‘God’ so important to Christians?

·        To be able to identify what the Bible says about God.

·        To be able to talk about what different stories tell Christians about God.

·        To talk about how Christians show that God is important to them in church.

 

Summer 2:

RE: LAS Unit: Our Beautiful World

·        To be able to listen to and engage with stories about creation and some beliefs about the natural world, e.g. the duty to care for the environment; make links with Judaism.

·        To be able to explore different stories of creation (Including Judaism, Christianity and Hinduism)

·        To be able to explore beliefs about the natural world and how human beings should relate to it.

 

 

Key Vocabulary

·        Different occupations e.g. fire fighter, teacher, postal worker, police officer, mechanic…, role, society, community

·        School, city, town, house, terraced house, shops, road, path, map

·        Past, present, toys, transport, events, artefacts, old, new, experience

·        Environment, place, change, adapt

·        Countries, weather, hot, cold, animals, plants, flowers

·        Fiction, non-fiction

·        Calendar, yesterday, year, month, week, day

·        Family, brother, sister, mum, dad, aunty, uncle, grandmother, grandfather etc

·        Religion, beliefs, faith, celebrations, culture

·        Different religions- Islam, Muslim, Christianity, Christian, Hinduism, Hindu

·        Religious festivals

– Easter- holy, cross, Good Friday, Jesus, hot cross bun, life, baby animals.

·        Seasons- Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer

·        Summer vocabulary-

·        Similarity, difference, diversity, contrasting

·        Experiment, prediction, results, record, observation, explore, process, changing states of matter

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours documents

·        Forest school focused activities building on from Forest School Sessions

·        Posters of different occupations and dressing up opportunities.

·        Visits and visitors regarding occupations – Possibly Royal mail, fire service, police service, vets, vicar,

·        Visit and visitors regarding animals and plants- Woodside Wildlife Park.

·        Floor books displaying previous learning- Focus on past and present events and artefacts, photo albums.

·        Books with settings from both the past and the present. Opportunities for children to engage in discussion about the books and refer to previous learning.

·        Books based on different religions; religious books (e.g. bible) and non-fiction books based on religions and festivals.

·        Non-fiction books based on plants, science experiments, houses, toys etc for children to explore.

·        Non-fiction books based on different countries.

·        Videos, photographs and maps of different countries and cities.

·        Opportunities to look through Tapestry and floor books and reflect upon our experiences. Which have been similar and which have been different? Why?

·        An opportunity to participate in a range of different science experiments; e.g. cornflour and water, ice melting, colour changing flowers. Paper to record data.

·        Weather chart to be completed daily, children able to change as and when needed.

·        Magnifying glasses and record sheets.

·        I spy with my little eye games to encourage children to explore their environment.

·        Clipboards, notebooks etc to record any observations in the environment.

 

End of Year

·        Past and Present

–        Talk about the lives of the people around them and their roles in society;

–        Know some similarities and differences between things in the past and now, drawing on their experiences and what has been read in class;

–        Understand the past through settings, characters and events encountered in books read in class and storytelling. People, Culture and Communities

–        Describe their immediate environment using knowledge from observation, discussion, stories, non-fiction texts and maps;

–        Know some similarities and differences between different religious and cultural communities in this country, drawing on their experiences and what has been read in class;

–        Explain some similarities and differences between life in this country and life in other countries, drawing on knowledge from stories, non-fiction texts and when appropriate – maps.

·        The Natural World

–        Explore the natural world around them, making observations and drawing pictures of animals and plants;

–        Know some similarities and differences between the natural world around them and contrasting environments, drawing on their experiences and what has been read in class;

–        Understand some important processes and changes in the natural world around them, including the seasons and changing states of matter

 

Baseline

·         Do I continue to develop positive attitudes about the differences between people?

·         Do I know that there are different countries in the world and talk about the differences I have experienced or seen in photos?

·         Can I explore and talk about different forces I can feel?

·         Can I begin to notice similarities between my family and others?

·         Can I confidently tell others who is in my family and can I share some memories about my life with others?

·         Can I use all my senses in hands-on exploration of natural materials?

·         Do I explore collections of materials and different materials, talking about what they see and the changes I notice?

·         Can I talk about what I see, using a wide vocabulary?

·         Do I show interest in different occupations?

·         Can I confidently explore how things work?

·         Can I understand the key features of the lifecycle of a plant and an animal?

·         Can I begin to understand the need to respect and care for the natural environment and all living things?

 

 

Expressive Art and Design
The development of children’s artistic and cultural awareness supports their imagination and creativity. It is important that children have regular opportunities to engage with the arts, enabling them to explore and play with a wide range of media and materials. The quality and variety of what children see, hear and participate in is crucial for developing their understanding, self-expression, vocabulary and ability to communicate through the arts. The frequency, repetition and depth of their experiences are fundamental to their progress in interpreting and appreciating what they hear, respond to and observe.

 

Characteristics of Effective Learning
Children will be engaged in: playing and exploring (children investigate and experience things, and ‘have a go’; active learning (children will concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter any difficulties, and enjoy achievements); creating and thinking critically (children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things)
3-4 Year Olds
Baseline

·        Do I enjoy moving to music?

·        Do I enjoy making sounds ‘music’ with instruments?

·        Do I enjoy and take part in songs?

·        Do I enjoy taking part in pretend play?

·        Do I create pictures using paint and other media?

·        Do I make simple models?

Skills and Knowledge

Being Imaginative and Expressive

Imagination and Creativity

·        Begins to make- believe by pretending.

·        Imaginative play is based around toys that closely represent the real item.

·        Imaginative play is based on familiar scenarios

·        For example, mixing the cake mix, talking on the telephone.

 

Musical Development/ Hearing and Listening

·    Shows an interest in the way musical instruments sound.

 

Musical Development- Vocalising and Singing

·    Sings to and with toys, props, resources.

·    Repeats phrases of songs.

·    Sings and chants with and to others.

 

Musical Development- Moving and Dancing

·        Moves in response to rhythms heard played on instruments e.g. a drum. This could be small movements e.g. moving fingers or large movements such as jumping.

 

Musical Development Exploring and Playing

·    Knows that we interact with an instrument to create sounds (cause and effect) by banging, shaking, tapping, or blowing.

 

ART

Drawing

·     Begins to enter the preschematic stage of drawing, gaining control over the marks being made.

·     Develops a bank of motions to produce marks.

·     Uses the arm, wrist, and finger muscles.

 

Painting

·    Experiments with blocks of colours and marks.

·    Paints the entire page to cover the background.

 

Colour

·        Has an interest in objects that are their favourite colour.

Multimedia

·     Explores how objects feel.

 

DT

 

Design

·        N/A

Make

·        Building blocks

·        Stage 2: Stacking, Rows and Towers or Repetition

·        Lines up blocks

·        Stacks blocks one on top of the other for a vertical tower/Lays them on the floor in rows.

·        Repetitions in their “building” determine the next step in block play.

·        Makes snips in paper while moving the scissors forward across the paper (about 6inches long).

 

Technical Knowledge

·    Imitates how an adult uses tools.

·    Engages and explores using a range of tools in the environment with the support of an adult.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Key song words

·        Tap, bang, shake, blow

·        Instrument names (specific to focus)

·        Simple colour names

·        Mark, draw, paint

·        Hammer, saw, nail, cut, join, build.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours

·        Differentiated role play areas according to need- use of key modelling and narrating by adults, scaffolded according to need.

·        Role play scenarios and areas focusing around familiar environments- home area.

·        Range of music instruments to explore.

·        Nursery rhyme progression (see CL)

·        Singing sacks, songs with props, use of technology to support (Ipad/ Smartboard and QR codes)- link to EAL songs and rhymes

·        Daily singing time, singing routine songs such as Hello Song and washing hands.

·        Regular movement and dance sessions using musical instruments and rhythm (use of music from cultures represented in our setting) simple beats in sessions, copying the drum.

·        Range of drawing and mark making equipment including large scale such as giant chalks and sticks- modelling from adults.

·        Use of pictures of children’s creations as cues.

·        Resources such as mops and brushes to develop gross muscle control.

·        Range of painting opportunities large and small scale with differentiated paintbrushes.

·        Sensory (tactile)  objects in provision (linking to ‘let’s talk about in CL)

·        Objects with different patterns, colours, tones and textures.

·        Sensory experiences linked to mark making- cornflour, IT, painting with hands and feet.

·        Range of different model making equipment- use ‘found’ materials in addition to blocks and materials.

·        Tools- simple hammer, saw, nail and opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- simple cutting of pieces to begin.

·        Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level.

·        Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks.

·        Weekly specialist musician sessions.

·        Visits from artists and specialists where appropriate.

 

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Do I respond to what I have heard, expressing my thoughts and feelings? Can I remember and sing entire songs?

·        Can I sing the pitch of a tone sung by another person (‘pitch match’)?

·        Can I sing the melodic shape (moving melody, such as up and down, down and up) of familiar songs?

·        Can I create my own songs or improvise a song around one I know?

·        Can I play instruments with increasing control to express my feelings and ideas?

 

Skills and Knowledge

Being Imaginative and Expressive

Imagination and Creativity

·        Takes part in simple pretend play, using an object to represent something else.

·        Imaginative play is based and driven by objects.

·        Beginning to develop stories using small world equipment like animal sets, and doll houses.

·        Imitates peers’ imaginative play. Play is based on associate play ( not much interaction between pupils but activity similar to that of others).

 

Musical Development/ Hearing and Listening

·        Listens with increased attention to sounds.

·        Describes the sound of instruments for example scratchy sound, soft sound, loud sound.

·        Responds to what they have heard, expressing their thoughts and feelings.

 

Musical Development- Vocalising and Singing

·        Remembers and sings an entire song or nursery rhyme from school or home.

·        Has strong preferences for songs he or she likes to sings and/or listen to.

 

Musical Development- Moving and Dancing

·        Moves body rhythmically.

·        Imitates movements in response to music.

 

Musical Development Exploring and Playing

·        Experiments with ways of playing instruments e.g., loud/quiet (dynamics), fast/slow (tempo).

·        Explores and is beginning to understand that adjusting our movements adjusts the sounds we produce with instruments

 

ART

Drawing

·        Begins to use representation to communicate e.g. Drawing a line and saying “ that’s me” and the meaning remains consistent when asked.

·        Drawings are symbolic and created with purpose and intent.

·       Restricts the use of a page to produce “an image”.

Painting

·       Experiments with applying paint with a brush using different movements eg dabs, splodges, sweeps.

Colour

·        Beginning to name and collect objects by colour.

·        The use of colour is more emotional than logical.

Multimedia

·        Enjoys experiencing different textures and sensory activities.

·        Shows interest in and describes (simple vocabulary) the texture of objects.

·        Uses various construction materials.

DT

Design

·        N/A

Make

·        Building blocks

·        Stage 3: Bridges and Passageways

·        Experiments with creating bridges, with two blocks supporting.

·        Experiments how to balance blocks.

·        Uses imagination in construction, for example props such as cars and trucks turn blocks in roads.

·        Bilateral coordination means that a “helping hand” holds the paper whilst cutting enabling them to begin cutting in straight lines.

 

Technical Knowledge

·        Relates tools to a specific purpose.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Small world names ie house, animal names

·        Scratchy sound, soft sound, loud sound

·        loud/quiet (dynamics), fast/slow (tempo).

·        Pretend

·        Song words- see progression

·        dabs, splodges, sweeps

·        bridge, balance

·        hammer, screwdriver, nail, screw, saw, cut, join.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours

·        Differentiated role play areas according to need- use of key modelling and narrating by adults, scaffolded according to need.

·        Role play scenarios and areas focusing around environments in the locality/ role plays they may have had experiences of.

·        Small world set-ups to include a focus on houses and sets of objects ie animals.

·        Range of music instruments to explore including some with strings and some from other cultures.

·        Opportunities to listen to different music (including that from cultures represented) both during play and in specific times.

·        Nursery rhyme progression (see CL)

·        Singing sacks, songs with props, use of technology to support (Ipad/ Smartboard and QR codes)- link to EAL songs and rhymes

·        Daily singing time.

·        Regular movement and dance sessions using musical instruments and rhythm (use of music from cultures represented in our setting) music that can elicit a response and music with a strong beat to follow.

·        Range of drawing and mark making equipment – picture cues and photos of children drawing in setting to cue.

·        Range of painting opportunities large and small scale with differentiated paintbrushes.

·        Sensory experiences to develop language- different textures and materials.

·        Range of different model making equipment- with prompts ie cars to support.

·        Tools- simple hammer, saw, nail and opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- cutting and joining techniques.

·        Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level.

·        Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks- encouraging conversations about verbal planning and evaluating.

·        Weekly specialist musician sessions.

·        Visits from artists and specialists where appropriate.

 

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Can I make imaginative and complex ‘small worlds’ with blocks and construction kits, such as a city with different buildings and a park?

·        Can I draw with increasing complexity and detail, such as representing a face with a circle and including details?

·        Can I use drawing to represent ideas like movement or loud noises?

·        Can I show different emotions in my drawings and paintings, like happiness, sadness, fear etc?

 

Skills and Knowledge

Being Imaginative and Expressive

Imagination and Creativity

·        Develops preference for forms of expression.

·        Creates movement in response to music.

·        Sings to themselves and makes up own songs.

·        Engages in imaginative role- play based on own first-hand experiences that includes roles and a simple narrative for example having dinner together, going to the shops

 

Musical Development/ Hearing and Listening

·        Identifies and matches an instrumental sound, for example hears a shaker and indicates that they understand it is a shaker.

 

Musical Development- Vocalising and Singing

·        Sings a few familiar songs.

·        Creates sounds in vocal sound games.

 

Musical Development- Moving and Dancing

·        Claps or taps to the pulse of the music he or she is listening to.

·        Claps or taps to the pulse of the song he or she is singing.

·        Uses movement to express feelings.

 

Musical Development Exploring and Playing

·        Plays instruments with control to play loud/quiet (dynamics), fast/slow (tempo).

·        Shows control to hold and play instruments to produce musical sound, eg holding a triangle in the air by the string with one hand and playing it with a beater with the other.

 

ART

 

Drawing

·        Understands that they can use lines to enclose a space and begin to use these shapes to represent objects.

·        Drawings show what the child perceives as most important about the subject.

·        Gives meaning to marks they make.

·        Marks recognisably represent an object for example people with head, arms, and legs.

·        Drawings include-squares, rectangles, and circles.

 

Painting

·        Uses large and medium brushes to add colour to add lines in sweeping movements to make simple representations.

 

Colour

·        Explores colour and how colours can be changed.

·        Distinguishes between colours and names them.

 

Multimedia

·        Manipulates malleable materials to create shapes.

·        Selects from a variety of resources to use in collage based on personal choices and criteria.

·        “ It’s pink , I like pink.”

 

DT

 

Design

·        Creates items of personal interest.

·        Uses the environment/images to support the decision of what to create.

 

Make

·        Building blocks

·        Stage 4: Enclosures

·        Closes spaces and creates enclosures.

·        Expands building to take up large areas of space due to improved special awareness.

·        Enclosures and bridges become the scenery for imaginative play with props like dolls, animals, and toy cars

·        Beginning to cut a curved line.

 

Technical Knowledge

·        Knows how to and can join construction pieces together to build and balance.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Construct, join, build, balance, enclosure, design, plan.

·        Colour names

·        loud/quiet (dynamics), fast/slow (tempo) pulse

·        Names of key instruments.

·        Hammer, saw, nail, screw, screwdriver

·        Key song words.

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours

·        Differentiated role play areas according to need- use of key modelling and narrating by adults, scaffolded according to need.

·        Role play scenarios and areas focusing around first hand experiences (either given by setting or through local experiences)

·        Resources which allow children to record themselves and play it back to orally rehearse ie singing to themselves.

·        Range of music instruments to explore including some tuned instruments such as xylophones and some from other cultures.

·        Opportunities to listen to different music (including that from cultures represented) both during play and in specific times with a strong pulse.

·        Nursery rhyme progression (see CL)

·        Singing sacks, songs with props, use of technology to support (Ipad/ Smartboard and QR codes)- link to EAL songs and rhymes

·        Daily singing time.

·        Regular movement and dance sessions using musical instruments and rhythm (use of music from cultures represented in our setting) music with pulse.

·        Range of drawing and mark making equipment.

·        Range of painting opportunities -differentiated paintbrushes.

·        Variety of malleable materials and opportunities for the children to make their own (link to cooking experiences)

·        Tools- simple hammer, saw, nail, screw, screwdriver opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- using real tools for a purpose- to build something specific.

·        Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level.

·        Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks- encouraging use of planning and design in mark making (design sheets and use of chalk doors).

·        Weekly specialist musician sessions.

·        Visits from artists and specialists where appropriate.

End of Year

·        Can I take part in simple pretend play, using an object to represent something else even though they are not similar?

·        Can I begin to develop complex stories using small world equipment like animal sets, dolls and dolls houses etc?

·        Can I explore different materials freely, in order to develop their ideas about how to use them and what to make?

·        Can I develop their own ideas and then decide which materials to use to express them?

·        Can I join different materials and explore different textures?

·        Can I create closed shapes with continuous lines, and begin to use these shapes to represent objects?

·        Can I explore colour and colour-mixing?

·       Can I listen with increased attention to sounds?

Reception
Baseline

·        Can I take part in simple pretend play, using an object to represent something else even though they are not similar?

·        Can I begin to develop complex stories using small world equipment like animal sets, dolls and dolls houses etc?

·        Can I explore different materials freely, in order to develop their ideas about how to use them and what to make?

·        Can I develop their own ideas and then decide which materials to use to express them?

·        Can I join different materials and explore different textures?

·        Can I create closed shapes with continuous lines, and begin to use these shapes to represent objects?

·        Can I explore colour and colour-mixing?

·        Can I listen with increased attention to sounds?

Skills and Knowledge

Being Imaginative and Expressive

Imagination and creativity:

·        Develops preference for forms of expression.

·        Creates movement in response to music.

·        Sings to themselves and makes up own songs.

·        Engages in imaginative role- play based on own first-hand experiences that includes roles and simple narrative for example having dinner together, going to the shops,

Musical Development Hearing and Listening:

·        Identifies and matches an instrumental sound, for example hears a shaker and indicates that they understand it is a shaker.

Musical Development Vocalising and Singing:

·        Sings a few familiar songs.

·        Creates sounds in vocal sound games.

Musical Development Moving and Dancing:

·        Claps or taps to the pulse of the music he or she is listening to.

·        Claps or taps to the pulse of the song he or she is singing.

·        Uses movement to express feelings.

Musical Development Exploring and Playing:

·        Plays instruments with control to play loud/quiet (dynamics), fast/slow (tempo).

·        Shows control to hold and play instruments to produce musical sound, eg holding a triangle in the air by the string with one hand and playing it with a beater with the other.

 

Being Imaginative and Expressive

Art:

Drawing:

·        Understands that they can use lines to enclose a space and begin to use these shapes to represent objects.

·        Drawings show what the child perceives as most important about the subject.

·        Gives meaning to marks they make.

·        Marks recognisably represent an object (people with head, arms, and legs).

·        Drawings include-squares, rectangles, and circles.

Painting:

·        Uses large and medium brushes to add colour to add lines in sweeping movements to make simple representations.

Colour:

·        Explores mixing colours and observes the changes.

·        Distinguishes between colours and names them.

Multimedia:

·        Manipulates malleable materials to create shapes.

·        Selects from a variety of resources to use in collage based on personal choices and criteria. “Its pink , I like pink.”

 

Design and Technology:

Design:

·        Creates items of personal interest.

·        Uses the environment/images to support the decision of what to create.

Make:

·        Building blocks

·        Stage 4: Enclosures

·        Closes spaces and creates enclosures.

·        Expands building to take up large areas of space due to improved special awareness.

·        Enclosures and bridges become the scenery for imaginative play with props like dolls, animals, and toy cars

·        Beginning to cut a curved line.

 

Evaluate:

·        Plays with their creations.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Key song words

·        Different movements

·        Vocabulary linked to common experiences- e.g. shopping, home, small world

·        Pulse, beat, loud, quiet, volume, fast, slow, tempo

·          Tap, bang, shake, blow

·          Instrument names (specific to focus)

·        Colour names, mix

·        Shape names – square, rectangle, circle, triangle

·        Resource names – e.g. brush, paint,

·         Mark, draw, paint

·        Vocabulary linked to personal choice- I like, love, dislike

·        Hammer, saw, nail, cut, join, build.

 

Enabling Environments

·        See Common Play Behaviours

·        Differentiated role play areas according to need- use of key modelling and narrating by adults, scaffolded according to need.

·        Role play scenarios and areas focusing around familiar environments- home area.

·        Range of music instruments to explore.

·        Nursery rhyme progression (see CL)

·        Singing sacks, songs with props, use of technology to support (Ipad/ Smartboard and QR codes)- link to EAL songs and rhymes

·        Daily singing time, singing routine songs such as Hello Song, Days of the Week.

·        Regular movement and dance sessions using musical instruments and rhythm (use of music from cultures represented in our setting) simple beats in sessions, copying the drum. Use of Go Noodle guided dance sessions.

·        Range of drawing and mark making equipment including large scale such as giant chalks and sticks- modelling from adults.

·        Use of pictures of children’s creations as cues.

·        Range of painting opportunities large and small scale with differentiated paintbrushes.

·        Powder paint for children to access after adults have modelled the WSPP procedure.

·        Objects with different patterns, colours, tones and textures.

·        Sensory experiences linked to mark making- cornflour, IT,

·        Range of different model making equipment- use ‘found’ materials in addition to blocks and materials.

·        Tools- simple hammer, saw, nail and opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- simple cutting of pieces to begin.

·        Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level.

·        Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks.

·        Weekly specialist musician sessions.

·        Visits from artists and specialists where appropriate.

·        Smaller scale construction materials such as meccano, lego, stickle bricks

·        Show off shelf to provide children with opportunities to play with their creation at different points throughout the day.

End of Autumn Term Checkpoint

·        Can I sing in a group or on my own, increasingly matching the pitch and following the melody?

·        Can I explore and engage in music making and dance, performing solo or in groups?

·        Do I watch and talk about dance and performance art, expressing my feelings and responses?

Skills and Knowledge

Being Imaginative and Expressive:

Imagination and creativity:

·        Uses available resources to create props to support role- play.

·        Develops storylines with detail in their pretend play for example, someone’s birthday , they sing and create a party.

·        Creates scenarios in collaboration with others where they have different roles.

·        Plans and communicates collaboratively about their play.

·        Notices what adults do, imitating what is observed and then doing it spontaneously when the adult is not there.

Musical Development Hearing and Listening:

·        Thinks abstractly about music and expresses this physically or verbally eg “This music sounds like dinosaurs”.

·        Distinguishes and describes changes in music and compares pieces of music eg “This music started fast and then became slow.” “This music had lots of instruments, but this music only had voices.”

Musical Development Vocalising and Singing:

·        Sings in a group or on their own, increasingly matching the pitch and following the melody.

·        Sings the pitch of a tone sung by another person (pitch match).

·        Sings the melodic shape ( moving melody, such as up and down , down and up) of familiar songs.

Musical Development Moving and Dancing:

·        Adjusts movement to the sound of instruments, eg walks, jumps, hops to the sound of a beating drum.

·        Replicate familiar choreographed dances eg imitate dance and movements associated with pop songs.

·        Choreographs his or her own dances to familiar music, individually or in small groups.

Musical Development Exploring and Playing:

·        Keeps a steady beat whilst playing instruments- his or her own steady beat in his or her creative music making.

·        Taps rhythms to accompany words, eg tapping the syllables of names/objects/lyrics of a song.

·        Plays along to the beat of the song they are singing or music being listen to.

 

Being Imaginative and Expressive

Art:

Drawing:

·        The preschematic stage of drawing develops so that pictures tell a story.

·        Combines shapes to create another (a rectangle and a circle to form a hat).

·        Representation become more mature with details emerging.

·        Drawings begin to show some understanding of basic observation.

Painting:

·        Holds a smaller paint brush correctly (matches pencil grip) to support control and precision.

·        Shows focus, concentration, and control painting within lines on a template.

·        Washes paint brushes when using a new colour.

·        Imitates a range of painting techniques modelled to them. printing, stamping, colour wash.

·        Knows painted pictures needs to dry and stores painting independently and safely.

Colour:

·        Uses a variety of colours when colouring and painting.

·        Selects a colour for a purpose (yellow for the sun).

·        Attempts to keep colours “clean” through washing brushes in between using colour due to their knowledge of colour mixing.

·        Beginning to understand and explore that a colour can be changed by adding black, and white for shades and tints and comments on observations.

Multimedia:

·        Selects from a variety of resources for collage due to their effectiveness to represent ideas ( based on aesthetics and malleability). “I used this paper because it is shiny like the fish scales”.

·        Verbalises choices for collage and construction.

·        Explores existing textures of objects and describes them verbally.

·        Imitates marks and textures into clay/dough surface.

 

Design and Technology:

Design:

·        Says what they are going to make before doing so and what it will look like.

·        Creates objects for a given purpose (for play or given functionality).

·        Explains to an adult what they have created and what it is for.

 

Make:

·        Building blocks

·        Stage 5: Symmetry and Patterns

·        Pieces are selected due to their size and shape to add symmetry and pattern.

·        Shows signs of creativity, as they add accessories to their structures. Whether it is vehicles, dolls, furniture, animals, or “loose parts” like scarves, rocks, or gems, it adds to the building dynamics.

·        Cuts around circles, squares and images, confidently changing cutting directions and the angle of hold.

·        Uses small construction materials that join in different ways with confidence.

 

Technical Knowledge:

·        Knows when to use specific adhesives (glue stick paper, PVA heavier items) and uses them effectively.

·        Knows that paper can be joined in several ways and applies this knowledge in their creative work.

·        Selects construction pieces due to their aesthetics, size or function.

·        Joins simple components in 3D structures effectively using a selected method of joining ( box modelling).

 

Evaluate:

·        Shows pride in their creations, labelling them for safe keeping.

·        Reflects on their project and says what worked well.

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Key song words

·        Different movements

·        Vocabulary linked to common experiences- e.g. shopping, home, small world

·        Pulse, beat, loud, quiet, volume, fast, slow, tempo, syllables

·          Tap, bang, shake, blow

·          Instrument names (specific to focus)

·        Colour names, mix

·        Shape names – square, rectangle, circle, triangle

·        Resource names – e.g. brush, paint,

·         Mark, draw, paint

·        Vocabulary linked to personal choice- I like, love, dislike

·        Hammer, saw, nail, cut, join, build.

 

Enabling Environments

·       See Common Play Behaviours – shows different materials to be used within the environment

·        Differentiated role play areas according to need- use of key modelling and narrating by adults, scaffolded according to need.

·        Role play scenarios and areas focusing around familiar environments- home area.

·        Range of music instruments to explore.

·        Nursery rhyme progression (see CL)

·        Singing sacks, songs with props, use of technology to support (Ipad/ Smartboard and QR codes)- link to EAL songs and rhymes

·        Daily singing time, singing routine songs such as Hello Song, Days of the Week.

·        Regular movement and dance sessions using musical instruments and rhythm (use of music from cultures represented in our setting) simple beats in sessions, copying the drum. Use of Go Noodle guided dance sessions.

·        Range of drawing and mark making equipment including large scale such as giant chalks and sticks- modelling from adults.

·        Use of pictures of children’s creations as cues.

·        Range of painting opportunities large and small scale with differentiated paintbrushes

·        Powder paint for children to access after adults have modelled the WSPP procedure.

·        Objects with different patterns, colours, tones and textures.

·        Sensory experiences linked to mark making- cornflour, IT,

·        Range of different model making equipment- use ‘found’ materials in addition to blocks and materials.

·        Tools- simple hammer, saw, nail and opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- simple cutting of pieces to begin.

·        Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level.

·        Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks.

·        Weekly specialist musician sessions.

·        Visits from artists and specialists where appropriate.

·        Smaller scale construction materials such as mecchano, lego, stickle bricks

·        Show off shelf to provide children with opportunities to play with their creation at different points throughout the day. – labels for the children to add to their work

·        Photographs of key experiences in life- birthday parties, Christmas celebrations to spark imagination.

·        CD player with a range of different music.

·        Charanga Scheme of work

·        Opportunities to explore shapes – draw around, create pictures using 2d shapes.

·        Colouring pages to support painting and colouring within the lines.

End of Spring Term Checkpoint

·        Do I develop storylines in my pretend play?

·        Can I watch and talk about dance and performance art, expressing my feelings and responses?

·        Do I explore, use and refine a variety of artistic effects to express my ideas and feelings?

·        Can I return to and build on my previous learning, refining ideas and developing my ability to represent them?

·        Can I create collaboratively, sharing ideas, resources and skills?

Skills and Knowledge

 

Notes for ELG

·        Draws a variety of objects with increased detail and shapes, some based on detailed observations

·        Selects own painting techniques, resources, and tools to create representations.

·        Knows which primary colours are mixed to make secondary colours.

·        Explains the process they went through when making and the choices they made

·        Returns to and builds on their previous learning, refining ideas and developing their ability to represent them.

·        Creates collaboratively sharing ideas, resources, and skills.

·        Effectively selects own resources and fixings for their desired project.

·        Beginning to understand and show some awareness of stability and balance when adding 3D components together.

·        Explains the processes they went through whilst making and the choices they made.

·        Evaluates and edits their work throughout the making process.

 

ELG:

·        Safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools, and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function, share their creation , explaining the process they have used, make use of props and materials when role playing character in narratives and stories.

 

 

 

Key Vocabulary

·        The development of children’s spoken language underpins all seven areas of learning and development.

·        Key song words

·        Different movements

·        Vocabulary linked to common experiences- e.g. shopping, home, small world

·        Pulse, beat, loud, quiet, volume, fast, slow, tempo, syllables

·          Tap, bang, shake, blow

·          Instrument names (specific to focus)

·        Colour names, primary colours, secondary colours, mix

·        Shape names – square, rectangle, circle, triangle

·        Resource names – e.g. brush, paint,

·         Mark, draw, paint

·        Vocabulary linked to personal choice- I like, love, dislike

·        Vocabulary linked to explanation of choice- because, it worked, it didn’t work, plan

·        Safely, safety, stable, balanced

·        Hammer, saw, nail, cut, join, build.

Enabling Environments

 

·        See Common Play Behaviours – shows different materials to be used within the environment

·        Differentiated role play areas according to need- use of key modelling and narrating by adults, scaffolded according to need.

·        Role play scenarios and areas focusing around familiar environments- home area.

·        Range of music instruments to explore.

·        Nursery rhyme progression (see CL)

·        Singing sacks, songs with props, use of technology to support (Ipad/ Smartboard and QR codes)- link to EAL songs and rhymes

·        Daily singing time, singing routine songs such as Hello Song, Days of the Week.

·        Regular movement and dance sessions using musical instruments and rhythm (use of music from cultures represented in our setting) simple beats in sessions, copying the drum. Use of Go Noodle guided dance sessions.

·        Range of drawing and mark making equipment including large scale such as giant chalks and sticks- modelling from adults.

·        Use of pictures of children’s creations as cues.

·        Range of painting opportunities large and small scale with differentiated paintbrushes.

·        Powder paint for children to access after adults have modelled the WSPP procedure.

·        Objects with different patterns, colours, tones and textures.

·        Sensory experiences linked to mark making- cornflour, IT,

·        Range of different model making equipment- use ‘found’ materials in addition to blocks and materials.

·        Tools- simple hammer, saw, nail and opportunities to teach children how to use real tools- simple cutting of pieces to begin.

·        Range of scissors to support cutting skills at each level.

·        Large scale building opportunities with large blocks and planks.

·        Weekly specialist musician sessions.

·        Visits from artists and specialists where appropriate.

·        Smaller scale construction materials such as meccano, lego, stickle bricks

·        Show off shelf to provide children with opportunities to play with their creation at different points throughout the day. – labels for the children to add to their work

·        Photographs of key experiences in life- birthday parties, Christmas celebrations to spark imagination.

·        CD player with a range of different music.

·        Charanga Scheme of work

·        Opportunities to explore shapes – draw around, create pictures using 2D shapes.

·        Colouring pages to support painting and colouring within the lines.

End of Year (ELGs)

·        Creating with Materials

–        Safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function;

–        Share their creations, explaining the process they have used;

–        Make use of props and materials when role playing characters in narratives and stories.

·        Being Imaginative and Expressive

–        Invent, adapt and recount narratives and stories with peers and their teacher;

–        Sing a range of well-known nursery rhymes and songs; Perform songs, rhymes, poems and stories with others, and – when appropriate – try to move in time with music.

 

 

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